Marine Sciences (MAR)

MAR 120 Oceanography 3 Credits

Investigates the interrelationships among the geological, chemical, physical, and biological aspects of oceanography. Topics include origin and evolution of ocean basins; physical characteristics of modern oceans; seawater chemistry; ocean and atmosphere interactions; ocean currents; waves and tides; coastal processes; biological productivity; and diversity, distribution and adaptations of marine organisms. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the processes that connect the seemingly separate topics to each other and to human life. Weekend field trips may be required. Three hours of lecture per week. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 120. Students may not get credit for both MAR 120 and GLS 120.

MAR 121 Introductory Oceanography Lab 1 Credits

Introduction to the fundamental aspects of geological, chemical, physical, and biological oceanography. Students learn through inquiry-based, hands-on exercises and activities using actual data collected in the lab and in the field. Independent projects and local field trips during lab and on weekends may be required. One three-hour lab per week.

Corequisite(s): MAR 120 or GLS 120 or as prerequisite(s).

MAR 210 Marine Life Through Time 4 Credits

Survey of the important developments in marine life over the last three billion years from the Pre-Cambrian evolution of one-celled organisms, through the Cambrian explosion of complex marine invertebrate life and subsequent diversification of backboned organisms in the Ordovician time, to the colonization of marginal marine and freshwater habitats in the Silurian-Devonian geological periods, and ultimately to extinctions during global crises of the late Devonian, Permian, Triassic, Cretaceous, and Pleistocene time intervals. The emphasis is on evolutionary adaptive breakthroughs within each phylum, particularly the significant morphological and anatomical innovations, and the subsequent radiation of these higher taxa into new habitats and niches through geologic time. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 100 or GEO 113, GEO 102 or BIO 115 or permission of instructor.

MAR 210L Marine Life Through Time Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): MAR 210.

MAR 227 Introduction to Field Marine Science: Subtropical Environments 4 Credits

In this two-week field course, students will explore various topics in marine science through practical, hands-on, inquiry-based exercises and activities. The course will focus on the biological, geological, chemical, and physical processes that influence diverse marine flora and fauna found in subtropical environments, emphasizing shallow subtidal and intertidal environments such as coral reefs, sandy beaches, turtle grass beds, rocky intertidal pools, and mangrove swamps. Examples of topics include the diversity, abundance, size, zonation, and morphological adaptations of marine organisms; the composition and texture of sediments; and the physical processes and chemical properties of water. These topics will be examined using field team exercises, a group mapping project, and individual research projects. Activities will help students develop their skills in research, use of field and laboratory equipment, computer analysis of data, and scientific writing. The course is taught at an appropriate marine field station located in a subtropical environment. Field portion of course is completed during the summer. Additional travel costs vary, depending on location.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 115 or BIO 116, and permission of instructor.

MAR 228 Introduction to Field Marine Science: Boreal Environments 4 Credits

In this two-week field course, students will explore various topics in marine science through practical, hands-on, inquiry-based exercises and activities. The course will focus on the biological, geological, chemical, and physical processes that influence diverse marine flora and fauna found in boreal environments, emphasizing the rocky shallow subtidal and intertidal environments. Examples of topics include diversity, abundance, size, zonation, and morphological adaptations of marine organisms; day-night fluctuations in tide pool chemistry; plankton dynamics; predator-prey relationships; the physical processes and chemical properties of water; and comparisons of wave-exposed and wave-protected sides of a shoreline. These topics will be examined using field team exercises, a group mapping project, and individual research projects. Activities will help students develop their skills in research, use of field and laboratory equipment, computer analysis of data, and scientific writing. The course is taught at an appropriate marine field station located in a boreal environment. Field portion of course is completed during the summer. Additional travel costs vary, depending on location.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 115 or BIO 116, and permission of instructor.

MAR 229 Introduction to Field Marine Science: Tropical Environments 4 Credits

In this two-week field course, students will explore various topics in marine science through practical, hands-on, inquiry-based exercises and activities. The course will focus on the biological, geological, chemical, and physical processes that influence diverse marine flora and fauna found in tropical environments, emphasizing the shallow subtidal and intertidal environments, such as coral reefs, sandy beaches, turtle grass beds, rocky intertidal pools, and mangrove swamps. Examples of topics include diversity, abundance, size, zonation, and morphological adaptations of marine organisms; the composition and texture of sediments; and the physical processes and chemical properties of water. These topics will be examined using field team exercises, a group mapping project, and individual research projects. Activities will help students develop their skills in research, use of field and laboratory equipment, computer analysis of data, and scientific writing. The course is taught at an appropriate marine field station located in a tropical environment. Field portion of course is completed during the summer. Additional travel costs vary, depending on location.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 115 or BIO 116, and permission of instructor.

MAR 290 Directed Research and Study in Marine Sciences 1-4 Credits

Provides an opportunity for freshman and sophomore students to gain hands-on research experience in the marine sciences. This is an individual program of study and each student will work with a selected faculty member on a topic of mutual interest. The course consists of a combination of project meetings, supervised research, and guided readings. The focus will be on formulating research questions, designing and conducting experiments, collecting the necessary data, reviewing the scientific literature as it relates to each student’s research topic in a weekly meetings with the instructor, and communicating the findings by writing a final project report.

MAR 325 Marine Vertebrates 4 Credits

A survey of the biology of marine vertebrate animals, including fish (jawless fish, sharks, rays, and bony fish), reptiles (sea turtles and sea snakes), sea birds, and mammals (manatees, seals, and whales). The evolution, physiology, natural history, ecological relationships, and human interactions of these groups are emphasized. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite(s): BIO 272 and BIO 272L.

Corequisite(s): MAR 325L.

MAR 325L Marine Vertebrates Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): MAR 325.

MAR 330 Chemical Oceanography 4 Credits

Introduction to the chemical aspects of the oceans and their influence on marine ecosystems and Earth processes. Emphasis is placed on chemical and physical properties of seawater, atmosphere-ocean interactions, biogeochemical cycles with marine components, production and destruction of marine organic matter, chemical ecology, and marine pollution. During the lab portion of this course, students gain hands-on experience in analyzing ocean water samples, experimental design, and interpreting marine chemical data. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Weekend field trips and independent projects may be required. Prerequisite(s): CHE 120, CHE 121, MAR 120, and MAR 121; or permission of instructor.

Corequisite(s): MAR 330L.

MAR 330L Chemical Oceanography Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): MAR 330.

MAR 340 Marine Processes and Environments: Seminar 3 Credits

This course is designed as a seminar course. Therefore, students will learn to lead class discussions, to analyze and critique peer-reviewed journal articles, and to enhance their presentation skills. Students will interpret graphical, spatial, and numerical data to support their positions. Content will emphasize the interactions among marine processes, biological features, and geologic landforms.

Prerequisite(s): MAR 120 or GEO 100; GEO 306.

MAR 360 Plankton Ecology 4 Credits

Examines the diversity, physiology, and ecology of marine phytoplankton and zooplankton. Students will survey the dominant plankton groups, their distribution, nutritional requirements, growth kinetics, and behavior. Planktonic predator/prey interactions and food web dynamics will be discussed. Students will also examine the interdisciplinary nature and role of plankton in biogeochemical cycles. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Weekend field trips may be required. Prerequisite(s): MAR 120 and MAR 121; or BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): MAR 360L.

MAR 360L Plankton Ecology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): MAR 360.

MAR 380 The Learning and Teaching of Marine Science 4 Credits

This field-based course provides a practical experience in integrating marine science with pedagogical concepts. Students will use scientific methodology to explain marine ecosystems through specially designed, inquiry-based exercises. During these activities, students will address the process of applying college-level content to their own classroom settings, considering national and state standards. Hands-on, field-based exercises will provide experience with a diversity of marine habitats and the biological, geological, hydrological, and physical processes that influence them. Visited habitats can include rocky intertidal, salt marsh, tidal flat, beach and channel sand bars. As a result, students will develop field and laboratory skills in marine science and use them in designing materials for their own classroom use.

MAR 401 Marine Ecology 4 Credits

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to fundamental principles in ecology, as it relates to marine systems. Topics include the marine environment and its influence on the organisms living there; biodiversity and speciation; factors regulating population dynamics in marine systems; larval and fisheries ecology; species interactions such as predation, competition, and symbiosis; factors regulating productivity and energy flow in marine systems; and marine conservation. Hands-on laboratory exercises will provide students with the opportunity to design and conduct experiments related to marine ecology, and to collect, analyze, and interpret data from those experiments. Ecosystem modeling will also be introduced. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Weekend field trips may be introduced. Prerequisite(s): BIO 272, BIO 272L.

Corequisite(s): MAR 401L.

MAR 401L Marine Ecology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): MAR 401.

MAR 410 Physical Oceanography 3 Credits

Introduction to the physical aspects and processes of the oceans and their influence on marine ecosystems and Earth processes. Topics include distribution of salinity and water temperature and their effect on water movement, the oceanic heat budget, atmospheric and oceanic interactions, ocean currents including surface and deep water circulation, waves, tides, and medium- to small-scale circulation features. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on how these physical processes affect the biology and chemistry of the ocean. Three hours of lecture per week. Weekend field trips may be required.

Prerequisite(s): MAR 120.

MAR 480 Senior Thesis 3 Credits

A senior thesis is optional for marine sciences majors. However, a senior thesis is required for eligibility to graduate with honors in marine sciences. The topic for investigation will be chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty of the Department of Geological, Environmental, and Marine Sciences. The student must initiate consideration of a proposal to the Department. The proposal must contain a discussion of the proposed project and a timetable to be followed in the study. A departmental committee consisting of a major and minor advisor will evaluate the written paper submitted at the conclusion of the study or other approved venue. An oral presentation before the department at the conclusion of the semester in which the study is completed is required. Proposals must be submitted in final form no later than the end of the ninth week of the semester prior to the semester in which the study is undertaken.

Prerequisite(s): senior standing in the marine sciences major and permission of department chair.

MAR 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Immerses the student in field or laboratory research. The student learns to organize material, use the literature, make precise measurements, and obtain reproducible data. If possible, the student will publish the results or present them at a scientific meeting.

MAR 491 Internship in Marine Sciences 1-4 Credits

A supervised work experience in an approved organization where qualified students gain real-world knowledge and utilize their academic training in a professional environment. Placements may be in private, public, non-profit, or governmental organizations. These can include consulting firms, regulatory agencies, advocacy groups, and educational or research institutions. Normally, 50 hours of internship per credit is required. A mutually agreed upon method of evaluation will be formalized prior to the approval of the internship by the sponsoring faculty and could include a term paper or project report and a poster presentation.

Prerequisite(s): 2.5 GPA and permission of instructor.

MAR 580 Ind Marine Sci Field Study 4 Credits

This field-based course provides a practical experience in integrating marine science with pedagogical concepts. Students will use scientific methodology to explain marine ecosystems through specially designed, inquiry-based exercises. During these activities, students will address the process of applying college-level content to their own classroom settings, considering national and state standards. Hands-on, field-based exercises will provide experience with a diversity of marine habitats and the biological, geological, hydrological, and physical processes that influence them. Visited habitats can include rocky intertidal, salt marsh, tidal flat, beach and channel sand bars. As a result, students will develop field and laboratory skills in marine science and use them in designing materials for their own classroom use.