Biology (BIO)

BIO 100 Life Science:Human Emphasis 3 Credits

An examination of mammalian physiology and development at the cellular and organ system level, with emphasis on physiological homeostasis in man. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 101 Life Science:Genetics Emphasis 3 Credits

An examination of cell biology and genetics, with emphasis on the impact of these fields on human affairs. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 103 Life Sci:Ecobotanical Emphasis 3 Credits

Plant biology with emphasis on ecological interactions and economic uses. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 105 Life Science and Society 3 Credits

This course will highlight current scientific knowledge and the state of ongoing inquiry in often-misunderstood topics related to health and medicine. Topics will include, but are not limited to, stem cells, embryo editing, vaccination, genetic modification of food and animals, and the process of drug development. Throughout this course, students will learn basic cell biology and genetics as a foundation for scientific understanding in itself as well as how to detect misconceptions and myths related to science, healthcare, and medicine.

BIO 106 Life Science:Human Disease 3 Credits

An introduction to molecular, cellular, and human biology with emphasis upon diseases and disorders caused by mutation, bacteria, viruses, or parasites. The biology of human aging is also discussed. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 108 Life Sci: Biol of Human Aging 3 Credits

An introduction to the biology of aging manifest in the cells, tissues, and organs of animals and humans. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 109 From the Big Bang to Origins of Life 3 Credits

This course is a non-major science core course focusing on the interactions among astronomy/physics, chemistry, geology and biology. A consensus story has emerged about our origins from scientific insights obtained over the last 400 years. Many know this story that began with the Big Bang and proceeded through the origin of the galaxies and the origin of the elements to the origin of our sun, earth and solar system. The origin of the earth gave rise to the origin of life, evolution of bacteria, viruses, plants and animals, creation of ecosystems and ultimately the evolution of humans. We will proceed through the science slowly. By doing so we can take the information from all of the sciences and reflect upon it. The result of will be an enhanced appreciation for both the process of science and the awesome information we have learned about the natural world as well as ourselves. The study of our origins reveals that humans, all life, and our planet are intimately related.

BIO 110 Life Science: Inquiry Approach 4 Credits

An introductory course for non-science majors in which students develop an understanding of biological evolution, the molecular basis of heredity, the cell, matter, energy and organization in living systems, and the interdependence of organisms. In addition, students will develop an understanding of science as a human endeavor, the nature of scientific knowledge, and historical perspectives. Through investigative activities, students will develop an understanding about scientific inquiry and develop abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week.

Corequisite(s): BIO 110L.

BIO 110L Life Sci: Inquiry Approach Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 110.

BIO 115 Principles of Biology I 4 Credits

An introductory biology course focusing on major themes of biology: what is life?; Cells as fundamental structure and functional unit of life; information transmission, storage and retrieval; Diversity and unity of life explained by evolution. Three hours of lecture and one three- hour lab per week.

Corequisite(s): BIO 115L.

BIO 115L Principles of Biology I Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 115.

BIO 116 Principles of Biology II 4 Credits

An introductory biology course focusing on major themes of biology: Energy and matter to carry out life's essential functions; Interdependent relationships characterize biological systems (homeostasis, growth & development); Behavior of living things; Ecology and the environment. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week.

Corequisite(s): BIO 116L.

BIO 116L Principles of Biology II Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 116.

BIO 206 The Pharmaceutical Industry 3 Credits

An introduction to drug discovery and development. Topics include how drugs are used to diagnose, cure, treat, and prevent disease and how drugs affect body function. The origins of diseases and the early attempts at treatment are also covered. Designed for business majors; does not satisfy requirements for the biology major.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 100 or BIO 101 or BIO 106 or BIO 108 or BNS 107 or CHE 115.

BIO 210 Hospital Intern Program 2 Credits

An internship that provides students with the experience in the practical aspects of medicine. Major departments in the hospital such as the emergency room, operating room, clinic, radiology, and the laboratory will be open for student rotations. Field trips to various medical schools in the area will provide information on professional school educational opportunities available in the health professions.

Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing or above and permission of instructor.

BIO 215 Medical Microbiology 4 Credits

Biology of prokaryotes of medical interest with emphasis placed on diversity and host-pathogen interaction. Current research literature will be covered and presented by students. Methods of microbial identification are introduced in the laboratory and applied in the identification of mock clinical isolates. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115/115L and BIO 116/116L.

Corequisite(s): BIO 215L.

BIO 215L Microbiology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 215.

BIO 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 Credits

A comprehensive survey of the structure and function of musculo-skeletal systems, neuroendocrine systems and related tissues and cellular interactions. Physiological applications include homeostasis, muscle dynamics, and cell activities. Laboratory exercises complement lecture material through the use of animal dissections, wet labs, computer-assisted investigations, microscopy, and models. Exams, case histories, personal investigations, and lab practicums assess learning. Course emphasis supports allied health and pre-professional training. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Designed for allied health students; does not satisfy requirements for the biology major. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115.

Corequisite(s): BIO 221L.

BIO 221L Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 221.

BIO 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 Credits

A comprehensive survey of the organ systems of the body including special senses, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproduction and development. Physiological components include electrolytes, metabolism, nutrition, and the mechanisms of homeostasis and cell reception. Lab studies support lecture material through dissections, wet labs, computer-assisted learning, microscopy, and models. Assessment includes lab practicums, exams, and reports. Course emphasis supports allied health and pre-professional training. Designed for allied health students; does not satisfy requirements for the biology major. Prerequisite(s): BIO 221.

Corequisite(s): BIO 222L.

BIO 222L Human Anatomy & Phys II Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 221L.

Corequisite(s): BIO 222.

BIO 260 Principles of Biology: Evolution, Diversity, and Biology of Cells 4 Credits

Lectures and labs focus on basic cell biology. Cell diversity and function, genetics and biotechnology are emphasized. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115 & BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): BIO 260L.

BIO 260L Principle of Biology: Cells Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 260.

BIO 265 Genetics 4 Credits

A comprehensive course focusing on molecular, Mendelian, and population genetics. Topics covered will include molecular advances in the study of genetics, including genomics and bioinformatics; evolution and the effects of genetic mutations; the application of population genetics to forensic science; genetic problem solving, including genetic crosses and statistical analysis; and regulation of gene expression. The laboratory for this course will introduce students to commonly used genetic model organisms and basic molecular biology techniques. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): BIO 265L.

BIO 265L Genetics Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 265.

BIO 272 Intro to Marine Biology 3 Credits

Introduces students to the study of marine environments, emphasizing the diversity, ecology, and physiology of marine animals, algae, and plants. Aspects of the human impact on marine environments are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115 or BIO 116 or BNS 118 and grade of "C" or better.

Corequisite(s): BIO 272L.

BIO 272L Marine Biology Laboratory 1 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 272.

BIO 290 Special Topics in Biology 3 Credits

BIO 300 Developmental Biology 4 Credits

Lectures and laboratories explore molecular, cellular, and genetic mechanisms of animal development. Aspects of gametogenesis, fertilization, induction, cytoplasmic determinants, morphogenetic movements, differentiation and developmental evolution are discussed. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): BIO 300L.

BIO 300L Developmental Biology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 300.

BIO 305 Vertebrate Physiology 4 Credits

Study of the principles and mechanisms of mammalian physiology. Topics include the nervous system, muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology, respiration, gastrointestinal activity, renal function, and endocrine physiology. Lectures and laboratory exercises emphasize homeostatic mechanisms and organ-system interactions. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): BIO 305L.

BIO 305L Vertebrate Physiology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 305.

BIO 315 Medical Microbiology 4 Credits

Biology of prokaryotes of medical interest with emphasis placed on diversity and host- pathogen interaction. Current research literature will be covered and presented by students. Methods of microbial identification are introduced in the laboratory and applied in the identification of mock clinical isolates. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116 or BNS 118, BIO 117.

Corequisite(s): BIO 315L.

BIO 315L Microbiology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 315.

BIO 321 Microbiology 4 Credits

An introduction to the discipline of microbiology, with an emphasis on the biology of prokaryotes found in all the natural realms of our environment, including the oceans, soil, atmosphere, and extreme habitats. Emphasis will be placed on microbial diversity, fundamental microbial processes, and the continual interaction between microbes and the natural environment. Classical and modern methods of identification are introduced in the laboratory. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Some field trips are required. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): BIO 321L.

BIO 321L Microbiology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 321.

BIO 335 Plant Biology 4 Credits

Biology of seed plants, including growth, development, and reproduction of flowering plants. Emphasis is placed on acclimation and adaptations demonstrating environmental influences on plant structure and function. Current literature involving molecular mechanisms of control will be discussed. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. One Saturday field trip. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116, CHE 122.

Corequisite(s): BIO 335L.

BIO 335L Modern Plant Biology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 335.

BIO 340 Evolutionary Biology 4 Credits

Where did we come from? This course will explore the generation of biological diversity on earth. Course topics will include: the history of evolutionary thought; the different lines of evidence and fields of inquiry that bear on our understanding of evolution; selection vs. random changes in populations over time; speciation; extinction; the molecular basis of evolution; and evolutionary developmental biology. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116, BIO 260, BIO 265.

Corequisite(s): BIO 340L.

BIO 340L Evolutionary Biology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course. Corequiste(s): BIO 340.

BIO 350 General Ecology 4 Credits

An investigation of the processes that regulate the distribution of plants and animals throughout the biosphere. Relationships among species and their interactions with the environment are stressed. Quantitative analyses of experimental results and current research in basic and applied ecology are discussed. Laboratory activities explore conceptual models using both field activities and computer simulations. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. One Saturday field trip (laboratory time will be adjusted accordingly). Prerequisite(s): Two of the following: ENV 100 with a grade of “B” or better; BIO 115, BIO 116, with a grade of “C” or better in each course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 350L.

BIO 350L General Ecology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 350.

BIO 370 Immunology 4 Credits

An introduction to the cells and molecules of the immune system with emphasis on recent advances. Topics include AIDS, autoimmunity, transplantation, and cancer. Readings from current journals will be discussed and presented by students. The laboratory will introduce current research techniques and then apply these to a research problem with critical analyses of the data generated. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): BIO 370L.

BIO 370L Immunology Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 370.

BIO 372 Behavior of Marine Organisms: Evolutionary Approach 4 Credits

An examination of the underlying mechanisms and evolutionary causes of behavior, including habitat use, feeding, and mate choice, particularly in marine organisms. The laboratory will involve collecting, analyzing and interpreting field data and performing experiments in the lab using a variety of marine organisms including fish and crabs. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Some full-day field trips (usually on a weekend) are required. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): BIO 372L.

BIO 372L Beh Mar Org: Evol Apprch Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 372.

BIO 400 Seminar in Cellular and Molecular Biology 3 Credits

Critical analysis of the scientific literature pertaining to current topics in cell and molecular biology. Topics may include: genomics, regulation of gene expression, development, and molecular processes of disease. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116, BIO 260, junior standing, and permission of instructor.

BIO 416 Bioinformatics 3 Credits

A comprehensive overview of relevant computer-based technologies used in genome research, DNA sequence analysis, and evolutionary biology. Will focus extensively on Internet resources and predictive algorithm usage for determining evolutionary relationships of organisms based on molecular evidence. Lectures will focus on terms and concepts frequently used in genomic and bioinformatic research, while computer labs will allow students to perform hands-on projects with actual DNA sequence data.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116, BIO 260, BIO 265 (recommended); Junior standing or Permission of the Chairperson.

BIO 420 Seminar in Organismal Biology 3 Credits

Critical analysis of the scientific literature pertaining to current topics in physiology and organismal biology. Topics may include hormonal control of behavior, immune pathogen interactions, and other aspects of whole animal and/or plant biology. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116; junior standing, and permission of instructor.

BIO 450 Seminar in Ecology & Evolution 3 Credits

Critical analysis of the scientific literature pertaining to current topics in ecology and evolutionary biology. Ecology and evolution of terrestrial and aquatic systems may include scales of adaptation, mechanisms, or human impacts. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116; junior standing, and permission of instructor.

BIO 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Immerses the student in field or laboratory research. The student learns to organize material, use the literature, make precise measurements, and obtain reproducible data. If possible, the student will publish the results or present them at a scientific meeting.

BIO 491 Internship in Biology 1-4 Credits

A supervised work experience in an approved organization where qualified students gain real-world knowledge and utilize their academic training in a professional environment. Placement may be in private, public, non-profit, or governmental organizations. These can include educational or research institutions. The method of evaluation will be formalized prior to the approval of the internship by the sponsoring faculty and should include keeping a journal of activities, a term paper or project report and a poster presentation. 2.5 GPA required.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.