English (ENG)

ENG 205 Understanding Literature 3 Credits

The novel, the short story, drama, and poetry are studied, with a view to the insights to be gained from literature.

ENG 206 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 Credits

A workshop that introduces students to basic conventions and techniques of creative writing. Students will read and study published writing in multiple genres, such as short fiction, drama, poetry, and creative nonfiction, and write and revise their own creative pieces.

ENG 208 Arthurian Legends in Literature 3 Credits

The legends attached to King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table have become cultural touchstones in England and the United States. This survey of medieval to contemporary Arthurian literature examines the legends and their written versions within their respective cultural, historical, philosophical and aesthetic contexts.

ENG 210 Major American Authors 3 Credits

An introductory course focusing on major American poets, novelists, essayists, and playwrights.

ENG 211 Major British Authors 3 Credits

An introductory course focusing on major British poets, novelists, essayists, and playwrights. Students will learn to understand, interpret, and evaluate literary works.

ENG 213 Literature and Mythology 3 Credits

The interrelationships that exist between literary works and folklore, ritual, and religious scriptures and beliefs are explored. The primary emphasis is on analyzing the presence of mythic patterns in specific literary works; the secondary emphasis is on theories of mythology.

ENG 214 Monsters in Literature 3 Credits

This course examines various texts on the topic of monsters. Students read and watch films, and explore the answers to the following: Who are they? Undead, alien, satanic, outcast, hidden, hostile, tragic. Where are they? Crossroads, arctic wastes, moors, abandoned buildings, forests, outer reaches, inside. What do they want? Revenge, bodies, lives, escape, life, contact, humanity.

ENG 215 Satire and Comedy 3 Credits

Explores these two related modes of literature with the primary emphasis on satire. Possible readings include works by Euripedes, Jonson, Shakespeare, Moliere, Voltaire, Pope, Swift, Dickens, Twain, Wilde, Waugh, Orwell, and Heller.

ENG 217 Intro To Shakespeare 3 Credits

Students in this course study Shakespearean drama on an introductory level through close reading, analysis, and discussion of selected plays. They learn the relevance and importance of Shakespeare’s themes, characterizations, and imagery.

ENG 219 Literature and Violence 3 Credits

This course will examine and critique themes of violence that have become a pervasive and recurring artistic thread in classic literary texts. Through careful, close textual readings and critical analyses of thematically selected texts that contain multiple artistic representations of violence in varied literary genres, students will explore literary violence as a possible metaphor for understanding dimensions of power, control and dominance. In analytical studies of thematically selected texts, students will gain new insights and critical perspectives on modern American society and the social causes and ills of violence. Students will delve into the root, cause and meaning of violence and they will further grow to understand why and how violence still maintains a pervasive presence in their daily lives and in the very literature they read.

ENG 220 Literature & Society 3 Credits

Literature is examined, emphasizing human behavior as it relates to such social phenomena as war, alienation, social disorganization, injustice, and poverty.

ENG 221 Literature and Psychology 3 Credits

Students will study Freudian and other psychoanalytical concepts as they appear in literature, plus psychological patterns of behavior such as aggression, frustration, and submission, that have been utilized by creative literary artists to expand the reader’s understanding of the human experience.

ENG 224 Science Fiction 3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to science fiction, its major themes and preoccupations, as well as some of its significant authors and genres. It has been argued that science fiction or “speculative” fiction represents a viable way to make sense of our everyday world. Our primary focus, therefore, will be on how these texts--written and visual--help us understand our culture and ourselves through encounters with alien and unfamiliar worlds, species, and technology. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to critically engage with science fiction, and to identify its broad cultural impact.

ENG 226 Introduction to Film 3 Credits

Focuses on various cinematic techniques used to develop underlying thematic and symbolic concepts and to shape viewer response. Students will analyze classical and contemporary features for their masterful use of visual language.

ENG 228 Black American Lit 3 Credits

A survey of writings by black Americans, presented historically from early slave narratives through emancipation, reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and literature from the 1930s to the present.

ENG 229 Multi-Ethnic Lit in America 3 Credits

Surveys the literature of various ethnic groups including African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, Jewish Americans and European Americans.

ENG 230 Women In Literature 3 Credits

A range of literary presentations of the female experience and of the conditions of women’s lives is explored. These works are placed in historical and social contexts in order to see behind and beyond traditional literary conventions.

ENG 236 Applied Grammar & Syntax 3 Credits

This course offers a review of the essential elements of English grammar and syntax and fosters analysis of these elements as they relate to meaning and rhetorical effects in notable argumentative and expository writing as well as in the student's own compositions. Focus is on both expert reading and expository writing. Changing attitudes toward usage, including influence of digital media on language use, are discussed. May be taken as preparation for, or independently of ENG 336, which addresses grammar, syntax, and style at a more advanced level.

Prerequisite(s): CMP120 or BHP 100; and CMP125 or CMP203 or BHP150.

ENG 240 Methods of Literary Analysis 3 Credits

The study and application of various modes of literary criticism practiced, including formal, structural, psychological, and sociocultural methods of analysis. Required of all English literature and writing majors.

ENG 250 Literary History I 3 Credits

Surveys British literature beginning with the old English epic of Beowulf and ending with the British Romantic writers of the early 1800s. There will be an emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts of the works discussed as well as an appreciation for the aesthetic qualities of the individual texts and the characteristics of literary movements. This course is a prerequisite to ENG 251 and is required of all English majors and minors.

ENG 251 Literary History II 3 Credits

Surveys American and British literature since the 1820s. There will be an emphasis on the cultural and historical contexts of the works discussed as well as an appreciation for the aesthetic qualities of the individual texts and the characteristics of literary movements. Required of all English majors and minors.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 250 or permission of the instructor or chairperson.

ENG 270 Major Poets 3 Credits

Studies major American and British poets.

ENG 275 Posthumanism: Bodies and Technology in Literature 3 Credits

This course explores the concept of posthumanism in speculative and futuristic literature. Who counts as human? How do advances in science and technology change what it means to be human? How much can we change our bodies before we stop being human? Categories of posthumanism that may be explored include virtual reality, cybercultures, and bodily transcendence; cyborgs; body modification, duplication, and replacement; cloning; genetic engineering; and postapocalyptic/ecocritical narratives.

ENG 280 Special Topics in Literature 3 Credits

Uses literary works to achieve insights into different areas of human experience. Topics change annually as announced by the English department.

ENG 281 Global Film History: Origins to 1960 3 Credits

Examines major technological and aesthetic developments in both American and international cinema of the period, with an emphasis on global cinema. From silent comedy and melodrama to German Expressionism and Soviet activist cinema; from French poetic realism and Italian Neo-realism to Hollywood sound cinema, this course will survey and assess the impact of influential movements, major film artists, and groundbreaking films of the period. ENG 281 is crosslisted with FMS 250.

ENG 282 Global Film History: 1961 to Present 3 Credits

Examines major technological, industrial and aesthetic developments in both American and international cinema of the period. From the decline of the studio system and the emergence of the 'New Hollywood' to the digital revolution; from the renaissance in Western and Eastern European cinemas to Latin American, Asian, and Middle Eastern cinema, this course will survey and assess the impact of influential movements, major film artists, and groundbreaking films of the period. ENG 282 is crosslisted with FMS 251.

ENG 284 Language of Film Analysis 3 Credits

Provides students with the fundamentals necessary for achieving beginning proficiency in methods of cinema studies scholarship. The course provides an in-depth introduction to concepts of film analysis, theory, and history, as well as to the field of cinema studies as an academic discipline. Through close analysis of selected films and readings, students will examine the various and complex ways in which formal elements shape meaning. Students also will study key concepts in film theory, applying these concepts as a further means of understanding the ways in which film positions viewers and mediates ideology. Required of all English majors and minors with a cinema studies concentration. ENG 284 is crosslisted with FMS 284.

ENG 285 American Film History: Origins to 1960 3 Credits

Examines major technological and aesthetic developments in American cinema as it grew from the days of one-reel silent shorts exhibited in storefront theaters through the days of studio productions exhibited in lavish picture palaces and featuring iconic stars the system manufactured and promoted. From the inception of sound and color, to the later development of lightweight equipment that freed filmmakers from the confines of the studio, from the “golden age” to the gradual decline of the Hollywood studio system in the 1950s, we will study the lasting genres that grew out of the system, the filmmakers who flourished and those who rebelled against the system, and the ground-breaking films that established the American film industry as a dominant force within the world. ENG 285 is crosslisted with FMS 252.

ENG 286 American Film History: 1961 to Present 3 Credits

Examines the transitions of Hollywood in the post-studio era— the rise of the 1960’s-1970s New Hollywood and its ground-breaking films, the rise of the blockbuster as an industry standard; the responses of independent filmmakers and the avant-garde to blockbuster dominance; the transition from the Production Code to the ratings system, the move back to studio- owned theaters, and the emergence of digital cinema and CGI. We will look at how genres are being redefined, how major filmmakers are re-shaping their work to fit 21st century demands, how “gaming,” YouTube, and other media sources are altering the very definition of cinema. ENG 286 is crosslisted with FMS 253.

ENG 290 The Short Story 3 Credits

Presents the development of the short story from the 19th century to the present with an emphasis on the techniques of plot, setting, characterization, theme, and point of view.

ENG 295 Human Relationships in Lit (honors) 3 Credits

Through in-depth analysis of significant pairs of literary works from a variety of time periods, students in this honors course will study the dynamics of human relationships as they are presented in literature. Emphasis will be on portrayal of interpersonal relationships as inflected by conventions, constraints, and taboos. Social and psychological theories will complement esthetic and formal analysis of fiction, drama, poetry, and film.

Prerequisite(s): 3.3 GPA.

ENG 303 Creative Writing: Poetry 3 Credits

A workshop analyzing the techniques of poetic expression, with a focus on the student’s original experiments in traditional and contemporary verse forms.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 304 Creative Writing: Fiction 3 Credits

Students write original fiction and analyze the techniques of writing fiction in discussion of both their own drafts and published examples of the form.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 305 Creative Writing: Nonfiction 3 Credits

A workshop in Creative Nonfiction (aka Literary Nonfiction or Narrative Nonfiction, abbreviated CNF) in which students will write and read different forms of memoir and essay, including Personal Essay, Lyric Essay, Travel Writing, Oral History, and Personal Profiles. Creative Nonfiction (CNF) tells true stories using the literary techniques of fiction-writing, such as building dramatic scenes, establishing suspense, and developing a narrative sequence of events, or plot. CNF employs vivid sensory detail and builds characters and scenes to enhance the reader’s experience of the story. Challenging the traditional journalist’s stance of objectivity and emotional distance from her topics, CNF writers often put themselves into their stories to create a voice of reflection. We’ll talk about what types of creative license CNF gives writers, and also about the ethics of storytelling, especially when your story’s characters are real, living people.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 306 Creative Writing:Drama 3 Credits

Examines cultural developments in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Topics include popular culture, intellectual history, gender history, literary history, film, institutions like museums and department stores, subcultures and countercultures, popular commemorations like World’s Fairs, and political culture. Some of the largest trends explored include the development of the modern culture of consumption, the urban landscape, and the polarization of cultural values.

ENG 311 Creative Writing: Playwriting 3 Credits

A workshop teaching and analyzing how students write for the stage that pays particular attention to the demands of the genre. Through reading and writing assignments, students will discuss and analyze the development of their own dramatic scripts for theatrical performance. A portfolio of revisions will serve as a final for the course.

ENG 312 Creative Writing: Screen Writing 3 Credits

A workshop teaching and analyzing how students write for the screen, both television and film, that pays particular attention to the demands of the genre. Through reading and writing assignments, students will discuss and analyze the development of their own dramatic scripts for production. A portfolio of revisions will serve as a final for the course.

ENG 313 Creative Writing: Experimental Writing 3 Credits

A creative writing workshop dedicated to developing a wider range of literary techniques. For the purposes of this course, Experimental Writing is defined as writing that departs -- in form, structure, or style -- from the conventions of literary realism. Students will demonstrate proficiency in writing and reading experimental fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, with an emphasis on experimental narrative techniques such as metafiction, magic realism, the unreliable narrator, multi-genre and hybrid forms (works that blur the lines between poetry and prose, for example), nonlinear storytelling, fragmentation, and poetic techniques such as found text and readymades, self-imposed constraints, and the collage or mashup.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 206.

ENG 315 Topics in Specialized Writing 3 Credits

A workshop in which students will write on specialized topics chosen by the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 316 Theories of Writing & Tutoring 3 Credits

A workshop on writing and tutoring theory for students interested in becoming writing tutors or teachers.

Prerequisite(s): minimum GPA 3.0, sophomore standing, and permission of the instructor.

ENG 318 Food Writing 3 Credits

Food Writing is a thematically based course in essay writing. It develops studetn abilities to write effective informal prose while also extending their knowledge about food sources, preparation, and consumption. They learn through readings and exercises, however, that food writing is about more than food. It encompasses the pleasures of the table, history, culture, science, and politics.

ENG 321 Workplace Writing 3 Credits

A workshop in writing effectively to achieve specific practical purposes in various business and professional workplace environments.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 322 Workplace Writing: Grant Proposals, Fundraising and Development 3 Credits

Students employ their analytical and writing skills to research and write grants for non- profit organizations in their local or regional communities. Fundraising and development activities on behalf of area organizations introduce them to career opportunities in this growing field.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 323 Workplace Writing:Reviewing and Publishing 3 Credits

Students learn to write arts and literary criticism through studying the work of prominent critics in literature, theatre, film, dance, visual arts, and music. Students learn how to market themselves as potential reviewers for print and online publications.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 324 Workplace Writing: Online Contexts 3 Credits

This course will help students adapt their writing to online environments. A writing- intensive course, grounded in rhetorical principles, it focuses upon planning, writing and producing online texts distributed entirely through virtual portals. Students will write documents intended for a variety of virtual purposes, including E-mail, instant messages, text messages, blogs, wikis, workplace social-media, and online team collaborations.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 331 Medieval Literature 3 Credits

A seminar in Old and Middle English authors, such as Bede, Chaucer, and Kempe, and texts, such as Beowulf, moralities, and mystery cycles. Students may be introduced to linguistic issues, historical and political concerns and critical topics such as literacy, canon formation, and gender.

ENG 333 16th-Century Literature 3 Credits

A seminar on Renaissance literature including such writers as More, Wyatt, Surrey, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, and Marlowe.

ENG 335 17th-Century Literature 3 Credits

A seminar on literature in England from 1600 to 1660, including such writers as Donne, Jonson, Browne, Herbert, and Marvell.

ENG 336 Grammar and Style 3 Credits

Provides students with a comprehensive knowledge of the conventions of English grammar, punctuation and syntax. Students will learn how to analyze the way words, phrases, sentences, and paragraphs work in expert writing, and they will apply this knowledge to their own writing, with emphasis on argument, exposition, and analysis.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 340 Restoration & 18th Century Lit 3 Credits

An exploration of literature in England from 1660 to 1800, including such writers as Astell, Pope, Finch, Swift, Defoe, Fielding, Johnson, and Wollstonecraft.

ENG 344 Biblical and Classical Influence in Literature 3 Credits

This course surveys biblical and classical influences on western literature from Shakespeare to Atwood. Its primary objective is to introduce selections from the Old and New Testaments, Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Ovid, and Dante so that you may recognize and appreciate references and allusions to these stories - their enduring influence - in early modern literature and culture.

ENG 345 Romantic Literature 3 Credits

A seminar on literature in England from 1780-1830, emphasizing a close study of the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, and Keats, as well as important novelists and female poets of the period.

ENG 346 Victorian Literature,1830-1900 3 Credits

A seminar on literature in England from 1830 to 1900, emphasizing close study of the literary culture, including such writers as Dickens, Browning, Mill, and Ruskin.

ENG 347 20th-Century British Lit 3 Credits

A seminar on literature in the United Kingdom from 1900 to 1960, emphasizing formal experiments as well as historical contexts, and including such writers as Joyce, Woolf, Beckett, Rhys, Delaney, and Eliot.

ENG 348 Contemporary British Lit 3 Credits

A study of contemporary literature written in English after 1945, in the U.K. and elsewhere, by writers of British, Irish, Scots, Welsh, and other cultural traditions. Poetry, fiction, literary essays, and drama will be included.

ENG 351 19th-Century American Lit 3 Credits

A seminar on literature in the United States from 1800 to 1900, emphasizing literary genres and the definition of an American literature as distinct from English literature.

ENG 352 20th-Century American Lit 3 Credits

A seminar on American literature from 1900 to 1967, including such writers as O’Neill, Hemingway, Faulkner, Porter, Richard Wright, Stevens, Moore, and Williams.

ENG 353 Contemporary American Lit 3 Credits

A seminar on American literature from 1945 to the present.

ENG 354 Selected Topics in English 1-4 Credits

Exploration of special topics, themes or methodologies in English. This course may be repeated for credit on different topics.

ENG 355 Sel.Topics:Bib & Classic Influ 3 Credits

Exploration of special topics, themes or methodologies in English. This course may be repeated for credit on different topics.

ENG 356 Selected Topics in English 1-4 Credits

Exploration of special topics, themes or methodologies in English. This course may be repeated for credit on different topics.

ENG 361 Selected Topics in English 1-4 Credits

Exploration of special topics, themes or methodologies in English. This course may be repeated for credit on different topics.

ENG 362 The Novel 3 Credits

A close reading of novels from various historical periods and cultures.

ENG 363 The Drama 3 Credits

A close reading of drama, with attention to cultural contexts and the genres of tragedy and comedy.

ENG 364 The Poem 3 Credits

A close reading of poetry, with attention to historical periods and poetic genres.

ENG 365 Short Fiction 3 Credits

A close reading of short fiction from a variety of cultures, with attention to the various genres of short fiction: short-short, short story, long story, and novella.

ENG 371 Classics of Children's Lit 3 Credits

An analytic study of classic and contemporary literature for children. Students will be introduced to a variety of critical approaches, including psychoanalytic, social/historical and feminist. The course may be of particular interest, but is not restricted, to students majoring in education or psychology.

ENG 372 Child Lit:Adolescent Exper 3 Credits

A study of enduring literature examines how exemplary writers chronicle the challenges of growing up. Texts may include influential Young Adult fiction, classics such as The Catcher in the Rye and To Kill a Mockingbird, and contemporary fiction by important writers who focus on the relevant themes.

ENG 375 Literature and Sexuality 3 Credits

The study and application of theories of gender and sexuality in various periods of British and/or American literature. Possible course topics include the literature of AIDS, the literary history of sexuality, Gothic literature and sexuality, colonialism and desire, and sensibility and sexuality in the later 18th century.

ENG 381 Studies in Film Genre 3 Credits

Provides an in-depth examination of a variety of film genres (such as the gangster film, the western, the musical, the screwball comedy, the science fiction film, and the horror film, among others), to be examined through the perspective of film genre theory. Through close analysis of selected films and readings, students will define the aesthetic and thematic patterns characterizing specific genres, and will trace the development of those genres within the dual contexts of the film industry and cultural ideology. Note: This course is cross-listed as FMS 381. Students may not get credit for both ENG 381 and FMS 381.

ENG 382 Comparative Film Directors 3 Credits

Provides an in-depth comparative study of major American, international, independent and avant-garde filmmakers. Through close analysis of selected films and readings, students will define the aesthetic and thematic patterns characterizing the work of individual directors and will draw meaningful comparisons among directors sharing similar aesthetic and thematic approaches. Students will trace the artistic development of directors through their careers, assessing individual works in the context of film criticism and theory, and in the context of multi-layered intertextual influences. Note: This course is cross-listed as FMS 382. Students may not get credit for both ENG 382 and FMS 382.

ENG 383 Global Cinemas 3 Credits

Provides an in-depth study of the history and defining characteristics of national cinemas. Through close analysis of selected films and readings, students will examine the general movements within the history and development of various national cinemas, with attention to film historiography when considering how patterns are to be viewed in light of the culture, politics, and history of a particular producing nation. Further, students will trace and evaluate the influence of selected film movements and issues upon both cinematic and critical practice. Note: This course is cross-listed as FMS 383. Students may not get credit for both ENG 383 and FMS 383.

ENG 384 Film Adaptation 3 Credits

Provides an in-depth study of intertextual influence, as film enters into “dialogue” with various literary forms. Through close analysis of selected films and various forms of literature-including novels, graphic novels, short stories, plays, poetry, and journalism- students will study the aesthetic specificity of both film and literary genres and will analyze the transformative qualities at play when a work is adapted from page or stage to screen. Note: This course is cross-listed as FMS 384. Students may not get credit for both ENG 384 and FMS 384.

ENG 400 Creative Writing: Advanced Creative Writing 3 Credits

An advanced workshop in creative writing.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 405 Advanced Prose Style 3 Credits

Analyzes prose styles in English from the Renaissance to the present, focusing on the development of syntax, diction, and content. Students will be encouraged to imitate stylistic models and to develop their own prose style.

Prerequisite(s): completion of composition requirements or permission of instructor.

ENG 407 Advanced Workplace Writing 3 Credits

Students will learn to adapt their writing skills to match specialized writing needs in publishing; corporate and personal finance; health, medicine, science, and technology.

ENG 411 History of the Eng Language 3 Credits

A seminar on the historical development of the English language, including phonetics, diversity, and present-day usage.

ENG 425 Seminar in Shakespeare 3 Credits

A seminar on Shakespearean drama and poetry.

ENG 435 Seminar In Milton 3 Credits

A seminar on Milton’s lyric poetry, Samson Agonistes, Paradise Lost, and prose.

ENG 441 Seminar in American Lit 3 Credits

A seminar focusing on literature by one writer or by a small group of writers.

ENG 443 Seminar in Literary Modernism 3 Credits

A seminar on literature from 1900 to 1940, by British, Irish, and American writers such as Hardy, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, Williams, Hurston, and Faulkner.

ENG 445 Sem in Black/Multi-Ethnic Lit 3 Credits

A seminar focusing on literature by black, Native American, Hispanic, Asian American and first-generation immigrant writers.

ENG 447 Global Literature 3 Credits

An in-depth study of the recent literature in English of one or more writers whose cultural identification is with one of the former colonies of the British Empire, as it was defined at the beginning of the 20th century. Literature in the English language, written by authors of African, Caribbean, Pacific Island, East Asian, or South Asian cultures may be included.

ENG 455 Seminar in Chaucer 3 Credits

An examination of Geoffrey Chaucer’s writings from a number of critical perspectives, including close reading of the texts in Middle English, context and history, gender and sexuality, linguistics, and paleography and codicology.

ENG 484 Seminar in Cinema Studies 3 Credits

Provides an in-depth study of areas central to discussion and debate in the field of cinema studies (such as film violence, cinema censorship, feminism and film, post- colonial cinema, African- American cinema, blaxploitation, The French New Wave, and Italian Neorealism, among others). Through close analysis of selected films and readings, students will examine the impact of specialized influential movements in film history and in film theory and criticism. Further, students will trace and evaluate the influence of selected film movements and issues upon both cinematic and critical practice. Note: This course is cross-listed as FMS 484. Students may not get credit for both ENG 484 and FMS 484.

ENG 485 Cinema Studies for Teachers 3 Credits

ENG 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Independent Research and Study allows juniors and seniors in good academic standing to investigate topics of interest under faculty supervision. For ENG 490 this may be an original literary or writing project. Projects must be approved by the faculty member, department chairperson, and academic dean no later than the third week of the semester in which the project is to be conducted. Only one project can be scheduled in a semester, and for no more than four semester hours; up to 12 semester hours of independent research and study may be counted toward graduation. Note that individual departments may have additional restrictions.

ENG 491 Internship in Writing and Publishing 1-6 Credits

Students work under the supervision of English faculty and on-site supervisors to complete real- world assignments in writing, publishing, and cinema studies. Their performance is assessed by professional standards. A minimum of 48 hours of field work per credit is required. Students report to faculty and on-site supervisors regularly, submit all work required by on-site supervisors, maintain a log, and complete a final report. Three credits required to count toward English writing concentration. Restricted to juniors and seniors.

ENG 497 Advanced Study 3 Credits

Qualified majors may apply for honors in their senior year. Upon approval from the department of English, a candidate for honors enrolls in Advanced Study, writes a thesis, and submits it for departmental approval. The student must achieve a course grade of “B+” or better to be graduated with honors in English.

Prerequisite(s): senior standing; 3.5 GPA in English; 3.25 cumulative GPA.