Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC)

Army Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC)

Mission

Rider University students are eligible to participate in the Princeton Army ROTC program through a formal cross-town enrollment agreement with the U.S. Army Cadet Command.  Princeton Army ROTC will recruit, educate, develop, and inspire ROTC Cadets at off-campus locations in order to commission officers of character for the Total Army; and develop citizens of character for a lifetime of commitment and service to the nation.

The Army ROTC course is designed as a four-year leadership program divided into two phases: the basic course and the advanced course.  The basic course is open to all students (100 series only. 200 series and above upon approval by the Princeton Army ROTC Professor of Military Science).  The advanced course is available to cadets who complete the basic course and wish to be commissioned as either active or reserve component officers.

The Basic Course

This course is primarily designed for full-time freshmen and sopho­mores who desire to pursue a commission in the United States Army.  However, students in good academic standing are encouraged to take MSCI 100-series and 200-series courses to broaden their knowledge and develop leadership skills.  Students enrolled in the Basic Course attend a weekly classroom session,  as well as three morning sessions of physical training and a Leadership Lab.  The Basic Course curriculum consists of introductory lessons in beginning soldier and leadership skills such as Army customs and courtesies, Army values, time management, effective communications, decision making, and physical fitness.

There is no military obligation associated with enrollment in the Basic Course.  Students are free to withdraw from the program as they would from any other academic course.  Students who desire to earn possible elective credit on their Rider transcript, upon successful completion of the course(s), should request a letter from the Director, Army Officer Education Program Princeton, to their college Deans Office, declaring the student (full-time) has satisfactorily completed the listed course(s) with nomenclature, grade(s), grade point(s) and credit hours for evaluation by the Dean.

Completion of the Basic Course is a prerequisite for enrollment in any of the advanced course classes; however, interested students with prior military service are encouraged to speak with a member of the ROTC cadre to discuss additional options that may be available.

The Advanced Course

This Course provides full-time juniors and seniors (and select graduate students) the opportunity to complete their professional development in preparation for commissioning into the United States Army upon graduation.  Approval by the Princeton Army ROTC Professor of Military Science is required for any student to enroll in the Advanced Course.  Once enrolled in the Advanced Course, students are obligated to complete the program and accept a commission, if offered, as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army.

Students enrolled in the Advanced Course attend a weekly three-hour classroom session, in addition to three morning sessions of physical training and a Leadership Lab.  Advanced Course cadets will lead the morning physical training sessions.  The Advanced Course curriculum focuses on organizational leadership, small-unit tactics, military history, war and morality, the profession of arms, and continuing self-development.  Advanced Course students plan, coordinate, and supervise the execution of ROTC activities outside the military science aca­demic curriculum.

Cadets who desire possible elective credit on their Rider transcript must request a letter from the Director, Army Officer Education Program Princeton, to their college Deans Office, declaring the student (full-time) has satisfactorily completed the listed course(s) with nomenclature, grade(s), grade point(s) and credit hours for evaluation by the Dean.

Advanced Placement

Sophomores have opportunities to enter the ROTC program at the beginning and end of the aca­demic year. Advanced placement does not result in the award of academic credits.

1.   Through the first semester ROTC Add/Drop deadline, sophomores who have not previously enrolled in ROTC may enroll in MSCI 201. A student who successfully completes MSCI 201 and MSCI 202, as well as additional requirements assigned by the instructor, will meet the basic course prerequisites for entry into the advanced course.

2.   Sophomores who missed attending ROTC courses during their first three semesters at Rider may have the option to attend the Army ROTC Cadet Basic Camp, a summer training opportunity at Fort Knox, KY, conducted during the summer before junior year.  This opportunity is subject to available slating.  This camp provides compressed instruction for all MSCI 100- and 200-series aca­demic year courses.  Student expenses are paid for by the Army and students are also paid a nominal salary for their attendance.  Students must indicate an interest to attend Basic Camp no later than February 15th of their sophomore year.

3.   Students with prior military service may receive ROTC placement credit for the basic course upon approval by the Princeton Army ROTC Professor of Military Science.  This credit is given on a case-by-case basis, taking into account the branch of service, length of service, type of discharge, and rank attained.

For further details on any of these programs, call the Army ROTC office at (609) 258-4225 or email to armyrotc@princeton.edu.

Activities

Army ROTC students participate in extracurricular activities as a student organization sponsored by the Princeton Army ROTC Department of Military Science.  These activities are designed to build camaraderie, develop leadership skills, and produce competent military leaders.  Activities include a weekly four-hour Leadership Lab where Cadets in all Military Science Courses perform practical exercises on subjects learned in class.  Once per semester, ROTC cadets attend a field-training exercise at Fort Dix in order to practice Soldier skills in a military field environment.  Other activities include color guard ceremonies, the Ranger Challenge military skills competition, tours of local battlefields (such as Princeton, Monmouth, or Gettysburg), trips to military conferences, annual holiday ball and awards ceremonies, and leadership seminars.  Each spring, cadets compete for the opportunity to attend military schools, such as Airborne (military parachutist) and Air Assault during the summer (slots for these schools are very limited and highly competitive).

Military Science Course Description

MSCI 100-series courses are open to all students.  For all other courses, enrollment requires the approval of the Princeton Army ROTC Professor of Military Science. Students complete courses as an extracurricular activity through the Princeton Army ROTC Department of Military Science.  All grades are counted in the student’s ROTC cumulative grade point average. Advanced placement does not result in the award of aca­demic credits.  These courses and activities take place at off-campus locations such as Princeton University, The College of New Jersey, and Rowan University.

MSCI 101/Introduction to Military Leadership I   (3 course unit)

(annually—fall)

Prerequisite: Freshman standing or permission of instructor

An introduction to the ROTC program and the Army. Classes focus on Army leadership and management principles as well as basic soldier skills such as first aid and map reading, and familiarization with the U.S. Army’s customs, courtesies, standards, and rank structure.  Students also receive an introduction to basic leadership principles expected of military officers.

MSCI 102/Introduction to Military Leadership II   (3 course unit)

(annually—spring)

Prerequisites: Freshman standing and completion of MSCI 101 or permission of the instructor

This course builds on the lessons learned in MSCI 101 in basic soldier skills and leadership.  Students learn how to use basic leadership and management techniques, improve their competence in basic soldier skills and tactics, and receive further professional development in leadership skills.  Students are introduced to the career field opportunities available to Army officers.

MSCI 201/Small-Unit Leadership I   (3 course unit)

(annually—fall)

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and completion of MSCI 100-series courses, or permission of the Professor of Military Science

This course provides students with the opportunity to attain the next level of proficiency in physical fitness, basic soldier skills, problem solving, and leadership.  This course introduces the operations order, a format for developing and communicating military operations, as well as further leadership development in effective communications, performance assessment, and counseling.  Officer career field opportunities and responsibilities are also addressed in the course.

MSCI 202/Small-Unit Leadership II   (3 course unit)

(annually—spring)

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and completion of MSCI 201 or permission of the Professor of Military Science

Students participate in learning activities designed to provide practical experience in the use of the military decision-making processes.  Oral presentation techniques and historical analysis of military decision making are also critical components of the course.  Students prepare to assume cadet, non-commissioned officer leadership roles within the cadet command structure.

MSCI 301/Applied Military Leadership I   (0 course unit)

(annually—fall)

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of the basic course (MSCI 100 and 200 series, or advanced placement)

Enrollment in this course marks a commitment to completing the ROTC program and receiving a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Army.  To this end, cadets study and practice the leadership aspects of planning and executing small-unit tactical operations.  Further emphasis is given to development of leadership skills as mea­sured by the Cadet Leadership Development Program, an evaluation system designed to improve an individual’s competence as a military leader.  Cadets get hands-on practice on these skills through assigned leadership positions within the cadet command structure.  Cadets continue to refine their individual physical fitness and assist seniors in leading unit fitness sessions.

MSCI 302/Applied Military Leadership II   (0 course unit)

(annually—spring)

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of MSCI 301

This course provides the cadets their final preparation for the Cadet Leadership Course (CLC) normally attended in the summer between junior and senior years.  Cadets refine their individual and military leadership, with practical exercise opportunities and feedback from senior cadets and instructors.  The course emphasizes leadership in small units, use of the military operations order, land navigation, and physical fitness.

MSCI 401/Leadership Development and the Profession of Arms   (0 course unit)

(annually—fall)

Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of MSCI 300-series courses

Cadets assume leadership roles within the cadet command structure. Cadets study the nature of military professionalism with respect to their future duties as officers.  Students learn how to assess performance and to plan and supervise training using the Army’s training management system.  The course strives to develop habits of independent study with historical readings and oral presentations. Cadets gain practical leadership experience as they lead the Army ROTC program.

MSCI 402/Leadership Development and the Profession of Arms   (0 course unit)

(annually—spring)

Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of MSCI 401

This course provides the final prep­ara­tion for an officer’s commissioning.  Learning activities include the Army Command Policy, Administrative Law, the Uniform Code of Military Justice, officer and enlisted evaluation and promotion systems, senior-subordinate relationships, performance counseling, and a tour of a historical battlefield.  Cadets gain practical leadership experience as they lead the Army ROTC program.

Summer Offerings

MSCI 222/ Cadet Basic Camp (Introduction to Military Skills and Leadership)   (0 course unit)

Sophomores (and select students headed to graduate school) who missed attending courses during freshman and/or sophomore year have the option to attend Army ROTC Cadet Basic Camp, a summer training opportunity at Fort Knox, KY, conducted during the summer before ju­nior year.  This camp provides compressed instruction for all MSCI 100- and 200-series aca­demic year courses.  All student expenses are paid for by the Army, plus students are paid a nominal salary of about $800 for their attendance, meals and housing are provided at no expense.  This opportunity requires the student’s advanced commitment to pursue a commission as an Army officer.

MSCI 333/Cadet Advanced Camp (Advanced Military Leadership Practicum)   (0 course unit)

All cadets who successfully complete their junior academic year and the MSCI 300-series courses must attend this five-week leadership development camp at Fort Knox, KY, where they are evaluated by commissioned Army officers on individual military skills and demonstrated leadership potential.

MSCI 334/Cadet Troop Leader Training (Junior Officer Leadership Internship)   (0 course unit)

Cadets who successfully complete MSCI 300-series courses in their ju­nior year and Cadet Advance Camp may request this opportunity.  Cadets serve in tactical, active-duty Army units for three or four weeks, at military posts either overseas (Germany, Korea, Hawaii, or Alaska) or in any one of numerous locations throughout the continental United States.  During this time, cadets get hands-on, practical experience in the platoon leader responsibilities they will assume as a second lieutenant.  Cadets often use this opportunity to “try out” the branch of the Army they are most interested in pursuing during their career.

MSCI 335/Army Nurse Summer Training Program (Clinical)   (0 course unit)

Nursing students who successfully complete MSCI 300-series courses in their junior year and the Cadet Leadership Course may request this opportunity to serve for three or four weeks in an Army hospital either overseas (Germany, Korea, and Hawaii) or in any one of the major military hospitals in the continental United States.  Cadets get clinical experience working with