Psychology (PSY)

PSY 510 Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis 3 Credits

This course will provide an introduction to applied behavior analysis. Students will learn the history and defining features of the field. Due to the scientific nature of applied behavior analysis, students will also learn characteristics and processes associated with the scientific method. Furthermore, foundational concepts will be defined, along with relevant behavior change procedures.

PSY 511 Principles of Learning 3 Credits

This course will provide students with more in depth understanding of the philosophical assumptions, characteristics and basic principles of behavior analysis. Students will have the opportunity to review concepts learned during Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis. This course will also provide and introduction to the basic research in behavior analysis. Students will become more fluent in definitions, characteristics, principles, processes, and concepts of behavior analysis.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 510.

PSY 513 Observational Methods and Functional Assessment 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills of methodologies to conduct a thorough behavioral assessment, interpret the assessment data, and identify goals for treatment. Topics will include direct observation/data collection methods, data analysis, functional assessment, stimulus preference and reinforcer assessments, and ethical and professional issues. The second half of the course will deal specifically with functional analysis including the history of and variations to the methodology. The relationship between assessment techniques and the development of the least-restrictive but most effective behavioral intervention will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 510, PSY 511.

PSY 514 Single Subject Research Design and Analysis 3 Credits

Students will be introduced to the basic evaluative methods used in behavior analysis including various models of single subject design such as multiple baselines, reversal designs, and alternating treatment models. Students will design analyses, collect data, graphically display their data, and provide an analysis of findings. Students will read original behavior analytic research articles and practice analysis of findings.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 510, PSY 511, PSY 513.

PSY 515 Psychological Tests 3 Credits

Examines the history of psychological testing. Issues concerning the construction of psychological tests are discussed, including concepts concerning reliability, validity, and item analysis. The rationale and structure of the major tests of intelligence, aptitude, and personality are reviewed, including the Rorschach, WAIS, TAT, MMPI, and Bender- Gestalt. In the last section of the course, students are given hands-on experience in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a standard test battery.

Prerequisite(s): any statistics course.

PSY 516 Creating Effective & Ethnical Interventions 3 Credits

This course will familiarize the student with ethical issues and responsibilities of behavior analysts working in applied settings. Informed consent, due process, protection of confidentiality, and selection of least intrusive, least restrictive behavior change procedures will be presented and discussed within the context of case method. Ethical decision making processes will be emphasized, and the relationship between ethics and law will be explored.

PSY 525 Cognitive Development 3 Credits

Compares and analyzes the major theories of cognitive development: Piaget, Information Processing, Vygotsky, Gardner, and Sternberg. The course describes cognitive growth from infancy to adulthood. Particular topics will include: concept formation, language acquisition, memory reading and writing, mathematical skills and sociocultural skills. Also of interest will be the use of cognitive theory in education, and understanding variations from the typical pattern of cognitive development as in mental retardation and prodigies.

PSY 530 Interventions for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to work with individuals with a broad spectrum of developmental disabilities. The course will begin with a discussion of typical child development and milestones, address how development might differ from the norm, introduce subsequent assessment and diagnosis and ultimately, introduce appropriate interventions. The main focus of this course is applied behavior analysis [ABA] and common ABA strategies for intervention.

PSY 533 Interventions for Autism 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a general understanding of the clinical characteristics of autism spectrum disorders. The course will briefly address etiology and neurocognitive underpinnings of these disorders but will focus on psycho-educational interventions. The course will be taught from an applied behavior analytic perspective.

PSY 535 Language Assessment and Intervention 3 Credits

Students will be introduced to the classification of verbal responses, both vocal and non-vocal. Using videotaped examples, students will categorize observed verbal behavior. Students will be provided with practical tools for the assessment of verbal behavior, as well as an array of intervention strategies. A focus will include the design of teaching strategies to enhance language acquisition, as well as ongoing evaluation of intervention efficacy will be employed.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 510, PSY 511.

PSY 536 Social Skills Assessment & Intervention 3 Credits

Students will be introduced to the development of social skills and the identification social skills deficits. Using videotaped examples, students will categorize observed social behavior. Next, students will be provided with practical tools for the assessment of social and emotional behavior, as well as an array of intervention strategies. Tools for the collection of data and the evaluation of the success of target interventions will be stressed.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 510, PSY 511.

PSY 545 Health Psychology 3 Credits

his course focuses on the biopsychosocial model of health in which biological, psychological and social factors contribute to health and wellbeing, as well as illness and disease. After a brief introduction to systems of the body, i.e. nervous, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, immune, this course will examine health enhancing behaviors such as exercise and nutrition, as well as health compromising behaviors such as drug abuse and other reckless behaviors, along with models that explain behavior maintenance and change. Additionally, attention is devoted to a discussion of how health psychology can function in shaping health care policy.

PSY 565 Drugs and Human Behavior 3 Credits

Presents the student with an in-depth analysis of the effects of alcohol and selected chemical substances on the behavior and body of the user. Commonly abused substances will be discussed in terms of their history, sources of production, routes of administration, distribution, metabolism and excretion, neurophysiology, tolerance, properties of addiction, withdrawal course and symptoms, and potential beneficial and harmful effects.

PSY 567 Multicultural Perspectives in Applied Psychology 3 Credits

In this graduate level course, students will examine in-depth, culture and: identity formation, social relationships, the perception and manifestation of mental illness, and treatment seeking among other areas. Additionally, given the increasing diversity of communities in the US, the course will also focus on immigration, acculturation, discrimination, and the psychological correlates of each. Implications of these factors for emerging practitioners will also be covered.

PSY 572 States of Consciousness 3 Credits

his course explores the variety of states that comprise normal and altered consciousness. It highlights how these states are deter-mined by complex interactions between conscious and unconscious mental functions. Key psychological concepts are applied in an investigation of various states of consciousness, especially meditative states and dreams. The course examines both the psychopathological aspects of altered states, as well as their potential beneficial effects on creativity and the development of the self.

PSY 574 Psychology of the Family 3 Credits

This course examines the significance of family in human development. Using prominent themes of developmental psychology, such as: the role of attachment in forming human relationships, the significance of context in understanding human development, and the resilience of development; this course will explore the existing research on the family. Students are asked to consider their own experiences as members of a family, as well as to understand the varieties of ways family impacts development across the lifespan.

PSY 577 Developmental Psychopathology 3 Credits

This course provides an in-depth view of developmental psychopathology as an applied and prevention science. Developmental psychopathology is concerned with the emergence and continuity or discontinuity of psychopathology, or maladaptive behaviors, across the lifespan. An emphasis is placed on exploring individual, environmental, social, and especially cultural influences in explaining normal and abnormal behavior.

PSY 582 Aging, Brain, and Cognition 3 Credits

This course covers the biological structures and processes underlying cognition in humans and explores modulating factors such as age, sex, disease, stress, and environment. The theoretical and methodological issues of developmental cognitive neuroscience research are addressed. Focus of the course is on brain structure and function in the largest growing segment of our population, persons over the age of 65, and the link between structure and cognitive abilities, both intact and declining. Special attention is paid to those factors related to successful aging and treatments with putative cognitive enhancers.

PSY 585 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Provides students with an opportunity to design and carry out original research in an area of their choice. Students designate a faculty supervisor and work closely with him/her during the semester. Permission of Instructor.

PSY 590 Field Placement in Applied Behavior Analysis 3 Credits

The applied behavior analysis practicum includes a required field placement of 15 hours per week and periodic on campus meetings. The practicum experience will allow students to experience the professional life of a behavior analyst in one of several preapproved sites. Sites approved include those for children, adolescents or adults with disabilities. Placements will be selected in consultation with the Practicum Coordinator and will require a written practicum plan from the cooperating field supervisor.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 510, PSY 511, PSY 513, PSY 514.

PSY 595 Selected Topics in Applied Psychology 3 Credits

Students will actively engage in an in-depth inquiry into a special topic area concerning applied psychology. Though the topics will change, students will be required to read and discuss current literature as well as considering the application of tools of the discipline to research questions of their own.