Sociology

Program Overview

Sociology helps people understand how social groups, organizations, social institutions and societies function, how they change over time, how they impact our lives — and how they are create and sustained, as well as how they can be changed. 

Sociology is the root of many other areas of study of human endeavor, and remains a source of their new developments. Sociological research and scholarship provided the foundation for management studies, communication and media studies, legal studies, and criminology and criminal justice studies, to name a few. That is why training in sociology can provide excellent background and skills for such a wide range of careers such as test marketing, public opinion polls, census data gathering and analysis. Some sociology majors decide to pursue further education and to obtain graduate degrees, for example, in law, urban planning, social work.

Curriculum Overview

The curriculum includes introductory courses in sociology and anthropology, a sequence of skills courses for majors and minors, and a variety of substantive courses on specific topics. Sociology majors with a grade point average above 3.00 may complete a senior thesis for the sociology honors program.

Sociology students take a total of 15 three-credit courses to complete the major, including a sequence of required courses designed specifically for majors including those double majoring in sociology and education.

Seminars at the freshman and senior levels provide extensive class participation, personalized instruction, and carefully supervised individual research. Courses in research methods and statistics instruct students in diverse techniques of information gathering and analysis. In addition to these courses, sociology students select a set of courses in substantive areas. Through consultation with their faculty advisers, students are able to focus on such areas of special career or academic interest to them as criminal justice, law, education, social services, management, or marketing.

Honors Program in Sociology

Honors in sociology may be achieved by earning a 3.5 cumulative average in the discipline and completing, through honors in sociology (496), a senior honors thesis with distinction.

Degree Offered

  • B.A. in Sociology

Contact

Victor Thompson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair
Fine Arts 281
609-895-5463
vthompson@rider.edu

Program Website: Sociology and Criminology
Associated Department: Sociology and Criminology

Related Programs

Sociology Major Requirements

(42 credits)

Core Requirements
See LAS Core Page42-43
Sociology Major Curriculum
Required Courses: 1
SOC 101Sociological Imagination3
SOC 201Intro Seminar in Sociology3
SOC 301Methods Of Sociological Research3
SOC 314Social Theory3
SOC 400Senior Seminar3
Select three of the following: 29
Social and Cultural Change
Issues in Modern Social Theory
Law and Lawyers
Class and Economic Inequality
Power and Politics
Social Interaction
Select six of the following sociology electives:18
Cultural Anthropology
Families
Deviance and Crime
Racial and Ethnic Relations
Social Movements
Youth and Crime
Introduction to Criminal Justice: Police, Courts, Corrections
Population Study
Social Problems
Drugs, Crime &American Society
Aging
Social Service Organizations
Media, Culture and Society
Schools and Schooling
Physical Anthropology
Area Studies: Africa
Area Studies
Area Studies:Indians of N Amer
Work And Occupations
Cities And Suburbs
Peasant Society
Pre-Industrial Economies
Social and Cultural Change
Women In Society
Gender and Criminal Justice
Social Theory
Issues in Modern Social Theory
Feminist Social Thought
Law and Lawyers
Religion and Belief Systems
White Collar & Corporate Crime
Punishment and Corrections
Population Study
Class and Economic Inequality
Power and Politics
Developing Societies
Police and American Society
Policing and Counter Terrorism
Race and Crime
Health Care and Society
Retirement and Leisure
Social Policy
Social Interaction
Applied Sociology
Sex and the Body in Society
Independent Research and Study
Internship in Sociology
Honors in Sociology
Honors in Sociology
Free Electives36-37
Total Credits120

Seniors planning to attend graduate school should take the Graduate Record Examination, including the Advanced Test in Sociology.

1

Course sequence recommendations:  The Sociological Imagination preferably should be taken in the freshman year, the Introductory Seminar in the sophomore year, Methods and Social Theory in the junior year. Your particular sequence of courses will be arranged in consultation with your advisor.

2

Additional courses from the above list may be taken beyond the minimum to satisfy the Sociology electives component of sociology major requirements

Sociology Minor Requirements

(21 credits)

SOC 101Sociological Imagination3
Select two of the following:6
Intro Seminar in Sociology
Work And Occupations
Social and Cultural Change
Issues in Modern Social Theory
Law and Lawyers
Class and Economic Inequality
Power and Politics
Social Interaction
Select four sociology electives:12
Cultural Anthropology
Families
Deviance and Crime
Racial and Ethnic Relations
Social Movements
Youth and Crime
Introduction to Criminal Justice: Police, Courts, Corrections
Population Study
Social Problems
Drugs, Crime &American Society
Aging
Social Service Organizations
Media, Culture and Society
Schools and Schooling
Physical Anthropology
Area Studies: Africa
Area Studies
Area Studies:Indians of N Amer
Work And Occupations
Cities And Suburbs
Peasant Society
Pre-Industrial Economies
Social and Cultural Change
Women In Society
Gender and Criminal Justice
Social Theory
Issues in Modern Social Theory
Feminist Social Thought
Law and Lawyers
Religion and Belief Systems
White Collar & Corporate Crime
Punishment and Corrections
Population Study
Class and Economic Inequality
Power and Politics
Developing Societies
Police and American Society
Policing and Counter Terrorism
Race and Crime
Health Care and Society
Retirement and Leisure
Social Policy
Social Interaction
Sel Top: Studies Soc. of Art
Applied Sociology
Applied Sociology
Sex and the Body in Society
Independent Research and Study
Internship in Sociology
Honors in Sociology
Total Credits21

Academic Plan of Study

The following educational plan is provided as a sample only.  Rider students who do not declare a major during their freshman year, who change their major, or those who transfer to Rider will follow a different plan to ensure a timely graduation.  Each student, with guidance from his or her academic advisor, will develop a personalized educational plan.

Plan of Study Grid
Year 1
Fall SemesterSemester Credit Hours
CMP 120 Expository Writing 1 3
SOC 101 Sociological Imagination 3
MTH 102 Finite Mathematics 1 3
HIS 150 World History to 1500 3
Level 1 Foregin Language Core 3
NCT 010 Freshman Seminar 0
 Semester Credit Hours15
Spring Semester
SOC 201 Intro Seminar in Sociology 3
CMP 125 Research Writing 3
HIS 151 World History Since 1500 3
Social Science Core 3
Level 2 Foreign Language Core 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Year 2
Fall Semester
Required Sociology Elective (1 of 6) 3 3
Required Sociology Elective (2 of 6) 3 3
Literature Core 3
Fine Arts Core 3
Natural/Physical Science Core 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Spring Semester
Required Sociology Elective (3 of 6) 3 3
Required Sociology Elective (4 of 6) 3 3
Natural/Physical Science Core 3
Philosophy Core 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Year 3
Fall Semester
SOC 314 Social Theory 3
Sociology Requirement 300 Level (1 of 3) 3
Required Sociology Elective (5 of 6) 3 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Spring Semester
SOC 301 Methods Of Sociological Research 3
Required Sociology Elective (6 of 6) 3 3
Sociology Requirement 300 Level (2 of 3) 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Year 4
Fall Semester
Sociology Requirement 300 Level (3 of 3) 3
SOC 400 Senior Seminar or Elective Course Credits 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
Elective Course Credits 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Spring Semester
Elective Course Credits 3
SOC 400 Senior Seminar or Elective Course Credits 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
Elective Course Credits 2 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
 Total Credit Hours for Graduation120
1

For course placement information please visit this website.

2

Please note that elective credits may be used to complete requirements in a second major or minor.

3

 Select from the following: SOC 311,SOC 315, SOC 317, SOC 330, SOC 340, SOC 355

Courses and Descriptions

SOC 101 Sociological Imagination 3 Credits

Introduction to principles and concepts for the sociological analysis of human societies. Social relations, social structure, and institutions characteristic of societies past and present are examined, and causes and directions of social change are considered.

SOC 110 Cultural Anthropology 3 Credits

The anthropological perspective is introduced, placing human behavior and institutions within their evolutionary, ecological, structural, and ideological contexts. Examples are drawn from the full range of human societies, with an emphasis on nonindustrial forms.

SOC 201 Intro Seminar in Sociology 3 Credits

Designed for students considering a major or minor in sociology. The seminar locates sociology in relation to other disciplines; reviews the basic perspectives used by sociologists to study human behavior; and considers the methods and applications of sociological inquiry.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 205 Families 3 Credits

Examines families in the United States, past and present, emphasizing the variety of family experiences in different social contexts and the relationship between family life and social change. Includes comparative material on families in other countries and considers possible alternatives to current family forms.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 206 Deviance and Crime 3 Credits

Considers deviant behavior as violation of social norms. Examines the concepts of deviance and crime in socio-historical context. Evaluates major theories advanced to explain deviance. Surveys different types of deviance, including conventional crime, non-criminal deviant behavior, and white-collar corporate, and government crime.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 207 Racial and Ethnic Relations 3 Credits

Examines the social origins of prejudice and discrimination, and analyzes intergroup trends in conflict, competition, and cooperation. Considers issues of immigration, economic and political power, and ethnic, racial, and religious pluralism.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 211 Social Movements 3 Credits

This course examines social movements that seek change in the social, cultural and political structures of society. The social, economic and political contexts of these movements are treated as well as their origins, tactics, organization, recruitment, and successes and failures. Case studies focus on movements in the areas of labor, civil rights, feminism, the environment, “right wing politics”, and neighborhood activism.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 216 Youth and Crime 3 Credits

In-depth examination of the nature and extent of youth criminality in the U.S. Explores changes in youth culture and theories of delinquency. Social policies are related to youth criminality and the youth justice system is considered.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 219 Introduction to Criminal Justice: Police, Courts, Corrections 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the sociological study of the criminal justice system. It examines the cultural and social foundations of this system, and review debates about problems with the criminal justice system and proposals to change it. Topics covered include nature of the crime problem, requirements of criminal law, policing, the role of the courts and legal professionals, sentencing, incarceration and alternatives to it. [FORMERLY SOC-319 Criminal Justice and Corrections] Pre-requisite SOC 101 3 Credit hours.

SOC 225 Population Study 3 Credits

Demography; its definition, historical emergence, and growth; population as a social problem in developing and developed nations; population theories, sources and methods of demographic data, population composition, and distribution; demographic processes including fertility, mortality, and migration.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 245 Social Problems 3 Credits

American social, economic, and political institutions and their interrelationships are analyzed, with an emphasis on the causes, directions, and consequences of social change in American society.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 246 Drugs, Crime &American Society 3 Credits

Explores the nature and extent of drug use in the U.S., how drugs are legally defined and socially constructed, and considers how and why drug policies have developed and changed historically. Considers how the criminalization of drugs has impacted policing strategies, courts, probation programs, sentencing and corrections, as well as other social institutions. Examines the role of local and federal agencies in enforcing drug laws, and considers debates about directions for legal reforms.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 247 Aging 3 Credits

The emergence of social gerontology, demographic foundation of aging, the aging process, comparative study of aging and aged, effect of aging on the individual, social institutions and aging, and problems of aging and some solutions.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 248 Social Service Organizations 3 Credits

Examines the growth and variety of social service organizations. The training of providers, such as teachers and physicians, and relationships between professionals and clients in settings such as schools and hospitals are studied as well as organizational decision-making, finances, and community relations.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 252 Media, Culture and Society 3 Credits

Examines mass-produced commercial culture, how it has developed, and the role it plays in modern society. Analyzes the content of these cultural forms, how its production is organized, and how audiences perceive it.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 261 Schools and Schooling 3 Credits

Schools and the process of schooling are analyzed within a broad historical perspective as well as within the structural and cultural context of American society. Education within a global perspective is also considered. Issues discussed include school funding, integration, tracking, technology, bureaucratization, and the “cultural wars” fought within the schools.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 269 Physical Anthropology 3 Credits

An analysis of the biological development of the human capacity for culture. Topics include: modern theories of evolution and their application to human evolution; the relationship of human beings to other primates, the human fossil record, and variation among modern human populations. A background in biological studies is not necessary.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 270 Area Studies: Africa 3 Credits

An intensive investigation of problems arising from historical and contemporary studies of tribal, peasant, and transitional societies in Africa south of the Sahara.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 271 Area Studies 3 Credits

Studies problems arising from historical and contemporary studies of peasant populations of Europe.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 272 Area Studies:Indians of N Amer 3 Credits

Societies and cultures of the Indians of North America from the Arctic to Mesoamerica. Emphasis on evidence of these tribal groups prior to extensive acculturation and their contemporary situation.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 300 Work And Occupations 3 Credits

Analyzes the nature and organization of work in modern society. Focuses on such issues as division of labor, specialization, alienation, professionalization, and the role of technological change. Includes an examination of the historical development of work in the 20th century, and a consideration of contemporary and future patterns of work organization.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 301 Methods Of Sociological Research 3 Credits

The second in a series of required courses for majors. Builds upon the Introductory Seminar in Sociology. Social research methods using documents, observations, and questionnaires are taught, and used in completing research projects.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 201.

SOC 308 Cities And Suburbs 3 Credits

Examines the growth of an urban way of life under the influence of industrialism. Study of community, political, and economic institutions in cities. Comparisons between urban and suburban areas.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 309 Peasant Society 3 Credits

A comparative view of peasants and their significance in agrarian, colonial, and industrial societies. Peasant economic, political, and social institutions are analyzed with an eye to both their internal operation and the way they relate to non-peasant groups who hold power in these societies. The changes that have occurred in the peasant world are viewed both as a consequence and a cause of wide reaching political and economic upheaval.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 310 Pre-Industrial Economies 3 Credits

The anthropological study of technology, production, and exchange in nonmarket cultures, as related to the social, ideological, and ecological systems in which they are embedded. The question of whether the concepts that derive from market economies can be applied to all economic systems is considered in detail.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 311 Social and Cultural Change 3 Credits

Investigates the process of change in both industrial and nonindustrial settings. Particular attention paid to the role of the individual in change as well as the roles played by the mode of production, social organization, and ideological constructs. Case studies are drawn from non-Western as well as Western sources.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 312 Women In Society 3 Credits

Examines changes in women’s roles and in male-female relationships. Focuses on impact of law, economy and social movements in shaping women’s positions as wives and as workers. Explores theories and evidence concerning the nature and extent of sex differences. Attention to women’s socialization through language, schools and media.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 313 Gender and Criminal Justice 3 Credits

This course will examine women’s experiences with the criminal justice system as offenders, victims, prisoners, and practitioners. It will consider how gender has shaped theories of crime and criminological research. It will explore how cultural constructions of gender have influenced substantive and procedural criminal law, the ways criminal justice agencies respond to crime, and how these have changed historically. Attention will be given to the development of new approaches, reforms, and challenges.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 314 Social Theory 3 Credits

Introduces the major thinkers and conceptual problems characterizing the development of sociological thought. Required of sociology majors.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 201.

SOC 315 Issues in Modern Social Theory 3 Credits

Examines current trends and issues in sociological thought.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 314 or permission of instructor.

SOC 316 Feminist Social Thought 3 Credits

An introduction to feminist social theory, with emphasis on its breadth and variety. Special attention paid to the ways feminist theorists have analyzed the relationship of gender to other kinds of group differences.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 317 Law and Lawyers 3 Credits

Relationships between law, the economy, and the state are explored. Discussion of laws, legal systems and legal reasoning using cross-cultural comparisons and historical analysis of these in the United States. Particular attention given to impact of law on corporations, workers, women, and minorities. Changes in legal profession and legal education are examined.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 320 Religion and Belief Systems 3 Credits

The relation of religious phenomena to social structures and processes; religion in cross-cultural perspective.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 321 White Collar & Corporate Crime 3 Credits

SOC 322 Punishment and Corrections 3 Credits

This course explores the nature, forms, rationales, and effectiveness of punishment as a form of crime control. It traces the development of corrections in the U.S., identifies cultural trends and developments in penology, including mass incarceration and supermax prisons, considers the ways race and class have shaped these, and the reverberating effects penal policies have had on American culture and society beyond the criminal justice system. It examines the role of laws, politics, crime control agencies, as well as of media, and corporations in shaping penal policies. Topics also include: prison subcultures, inmate rights, correctional practices, privatization of prisons, and alternatives to punitive policies of incarceration and capital punishment.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 325 Population Study 3 Credits

SOC 330 Class and Economic Inequality 3 Credits

Social, economic, and political aspects of the division of society into classes are considered. Theories of stratification and the distribution of wealth, power, and prestige in societies past and present are examined.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 340 Power and Politics 3 Credits

Examines the nature and distribution of power in contemporary societies; analyzes the relationships between power and politics.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 341 Developing Societies 3 Credits

Examines theories explaining patterns of development; indicators and measures of social well-being; and problems such as population, hunger and environmental crises in developing countries. Focuses especially on patterns of development in Latin America or China.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 342 Police and American Society 3 Credits

This course examines important issues regarding police in American society, such as the paradoxes inherent in police work, police organization and strategies and their effectiveness, the dilemmas of supervising police work, police unionism, the nature and implications of police occupational subculture, the use of police discretion, forms of police misconduct and accountability, professionalization of police and the trend toward police privatization. It also considers the diversity of the police force, trends in the delivery of policing services, the impact of new technologies on policing, and the challenges of policing in a multicultural society.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 343 Policing and Counter Terrorism 3 Credits

This course is designed as an upper level (undergraduate/graduate) combination lecture and discussion section on the foundations of international security. It will examine the concept of security from both the macro and micro level. We will discuss a mix of security strategies (balance of power, alliances, rearmament, collective security, deterrence), theoretical perspectives on security (Neorealism, Neoliberalism, Critical Theory, Copenhagen School), great power and third world security, democratic and non-democratic security, classic threats (changes in relative power, proliferation) and new threats (environment, population movements, terrorism), and concepts of security ranging from state survival, to societal security, to unit level-variables such as Human Security.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 345 Race and Crime 3 Credits

Examines the impact of crime policy on minority communities in the United States, with particular attention to the impact of “The War on Drugs”, three-strike laws, and mandatory sentencing on minorities and minority communities. Drawing on sociological research, the course explores myths and realities concerning the relationship between race and crime. The relationship between racial attitudes, historical race relations, and mass incarceration are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 346 Health Care and Society 3 Credits

Application and contributions of sociology to medicine; the strategy and methods of sociomedical research; sociology of illness, addictive and mental disorder; medical institutions; health services and medical care; and current status of medical sociology.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 347 Aging and the Elderly 3 Credits

SOC 348 Human Service Organizations 3 Credits

SOC 349 Retirement and Leisure 3 Credits

Examines the social phenomena of retirement as an event, process, social role, and life stage. Explores the meaning of leisure, time utilization, and creativity among the elderly. Defines related problems and issues, i.e., financial, physical, psychosocial, and environ-mental. Positive as well as negative implications are presented and evaluated.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 247 recommended.

SOC 350 Social Policy 3 Credits

Investigates the relationship between economic development and social policy in comparative and historical context. The main features of preindustrial, early industrial, and advanced industrial social welfare systems are described. Social, economic and political factors that shape social policy are investigated.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 355 Social Interaction 3 Credits

Examines the interpersonal relation between and among people in private life, public places, and at work. Explains how such relations affect and are affected by changes in the larger social structure.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 360 Spec.Top.: Drugs in Am. Society 3 Credits

Exploration of a specialized topic or problem in sociology. Permission of the instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 361 Sel Top: Studies Soc. of Art 3 Credits

Exploration of a specialized topic or problem in sociology. Permission of the instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 362 Selected Topics 3 Credits

Exploration of a specialized topic or problem in sociology. Permission of the instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 363 Selected Topics 3 Credits

Exploration of a specialized topic or problem in sociology. Permission of the instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 364 Selected Topics 3 Credits

Exploration of a specialized topic or problem in sociology. Permission of the instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 365 Selected Top: Social Movements 3 Credits

FALL 2012 - This course examines movements that seek change in the social, cultural and political structures of society. The social, economic and political contexts of these movements are treated as well as their origins, tactics, organization, recruitment, and successes and failures. Case studies focus on movements in the areas of labor, civil rights, feminism, the environment, "right wing politics", and neighborhood activism. In today’s world, social movements abound. Movements such as the Tea Party and the Occupy movements demonstrate that they can take place across the political spectrum of society. Moreover, the interconnectedness of the world economy creates social movements throughout the world, whether in Asia, the Mid-East or Europe that have direct affects on the United States. Because the coverage of these movements are given considerable media exposure, students (and the public) tend to accept the interpretations of these movements as presented in the narratives of the media coverage. This class will provide a systematic academic treatment of social movements. Because social movements target structural and cultural institutions in society, the study of these movements will not only provide an understanding of these movements, but of larger social problems in society as well.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 367 Selected Topics: Environment 3 Credits

Exploration of a specialized topic or problem in sociology. Permission of the instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 368 Selected Topics in Sociology 3 Credits

Exploration of a specialized topic or problem in sociology. Permission of the instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 369 Selected Topics in Sociology 3 Credits

SOC 396 Applied Sociology 3 Credits

Shows how sociology can be applied in work settings. As participant observers in organizations related to their career objectives, students learn to apply sociological knowledge, perspectives, and skills. In class meetings and individual consultations with the instructor, students examine the applied dimensions of sociology, the uses of sociology in various occupations, the ethical issues involved in applied sociology, and the culture and structure of their work organization.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 400 Senior Seminar 3 Credits

For sociology majors only. This seminar involves in-depth examination and research of a specific issue of current importance in the discipline. Learning to do sociology is emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 201, SOC 301, SOC 314.

SOC 401 Sex and the Body in Society 3 Credits

Examines cultural meanings and social practices associated with sex and the body. Contemporary cultural norms and practices in the U.S. will be compared to other societies, historically and cross-culturally. Variations in sexual practices, ideals of sexual attractiveness according to age, gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation also will be discussed. Topics may include beauty industries (e.g. cosmetics, diet, fashion, surgery, drugs), sex and the workplace, the impact of media, social policy, and technology on ideals of sexual attractiveness, birth control, and sexual violence.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Juniors or seniors who have completed at least 12 credit hours in sociology may propose an independent research project with the aid and advice of any full-time faculty member of the department. Proposals must be reviewed and approved by the sponsoring faculty member and submitted to the department’s Independent Study Committee at least four weeks prior to the last day of classes for the semester preceding Independent Study.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101.

SOC 491 Internship in Sociology 1-4 Credits

A supervised work experience in an approved organization to gain knowledge of applications of sociology in work settings and to analyze work settings using sociological knowledge and research methods. Placements are made in business, government, and community offices that utilize sociological knowledge or research skills.

Prerequisite(s): 2.75 GPA.

SOC 496 Honors in Sociology 3-6 Credits

Training in the efficient collection of data that has a bearing on the problem being investigated. Stresses the technique of proper summarization of the collected material as well as the integration of that material into a comprehensive report. A research design is prepared and hypotheses tested in the field. The original library research is then combined with the findings to produce a mini-thesis. Approval of student’s program by a sponsoring faculty member and the department Independent Study Committee is required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 201, SOC 301.

SOC 497 Honors in Sociology 3-6 Credits

Training in the efficient collection of data that has a bearing on the problem being investigated. Stresses the technique of proper summarization of the collected material as well as the integration of that material into a comprehensive report. A research design is prepared and hypotheses tested in the field. The original library research is then combined with the findings to produce a mini-thesis. Approval of student’s program by a sponsoring faculty member and the department Independent Study Committee is required.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 201, SOC 301.