Political Communication

Program Overview

Political communication is an interdisciplinary minor that is designed to investigate the manner in which new technologies and strategies of communication change the emerging political order, and the manner in which the emerging political order structures the dissemination of information among citizens of the United States and other nations.

The minor in political communications provides preparation for those students planning further study in graduate or law school, careers in governments, international affairs, political campaigns, political journalism, or private business concerned with government activity. Moreover, students should further their abilities to construct arguments based upon ethical and relevant data, think clearly and critically, and develop the facility to express themselves persuasively.

Degree Offered

  • Minor in Political Communication  

Contact

Michael Brogan, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chairperson, Political Science
Fine Arts 285
609-896-5000 ext. 7721

mbrogan@rider.edu

Program Website: www.rider.edu/politicalcommunication
Associated Department/College: Department of Communication and Journalism

Related Programs

Political Communication Minor Requirements

(21 credits)

POL 307Political Communication3
Communication
Select three of the following:9
Communication, Culture and Media 1
Theories of Persuasion 1
Argumentation and Debate
Communication and Society
Communication Criticism
International Communication
Political Science
Select three of the following:9
Understanding Global Relations
Public Opinion
Methods of Political Analysis
Political Campaigning
Special Project:Model UN 2
Special Project:Model UN (Presidential Election Poll - only offered in presidential election years) 2
Civil Liberties in the U.S.
Pol Parties & Electoral Behave
Political Film
American Presidency
Global Issues
Recommended Course
Select one of the following:4
Independent Research and Study
Internship in Communication
Independent Research and Study
Internship in Politicl Science
Total Credits21
1

May not be counted toward the minor by Communication and Journalism majors.

2

Only one special project may be counted toward the minor.

Courses and Descriptions

COM 102 Introduction to News Writing 3 Credits

Introduces students to routines of journalism, including reporting, writing and preparing content for print and web. Incorporates contemporary practices in multimedia journalism, including digital audio, video and photos, into traditional skills, with an emphasis on accuracy, clarity and professional style and voice. Class exercises are completed in a laboratory newsroom.

COM 103 Intro Comm Studies:theory&prac 3 Credits

Provides a foundation for the study of communication across the discipline. Open to freshmen only, it is designed to assist the first year student majoring in communication or journalism to gain a broad understanding of the scope and breadth of the field. Fundamental communication theories, principles, concepts, terms, and issues are introduced.

COM 104 Speech Communication 3 Credits

Examines basic communication principles and strategies of public speaking. Various genres of oral communication are studied, with an emphasis on extemporaneous and impromptu forms of delivery. Students research, prepare, and deliver speeches that are then used as the focal point for the discussion of effective speaking and listening. A number of speeches are videotaped. Students who received credit for COM 104S may not take this course.

COM 104S Intro to Speech Communication 3 Credits

As part of the EOP program, this course is designed to improve the speaking and language skills of new college students. Through directed practice, students have the opportunity to develop poise and confidence in oral communication, as well as competence in analyzing and synthesizing messages. Emphasis is placed on development, organization, and delivery of speeches. To receive credit, a grade of "C" or higher must be earned. Students who receive credit for COM 104S may not take COM 104.

COM 105 Communication, Culture and Media 3 Credits

Provides a detailed investigation and analysis into the nature, history, scope, adequacy, and limitations of mass communication and examines the reciprocal influence of the media on culture and society.

COM 106 Writing for the Comm Professns 3 Credits

Provides students with written communication writing strategies and tools. Applies theory and practice in communication to targeted audiences. Emphasizes the critical role writing plays in the communication workplace and provides an opportunity to evaluate and respond to real-life writing samples and situations.

COM 107 Writing for the Media 3 Credits

Introduces students to interviewing and persuasive writing techniques for print and electronic public relations and advertising formats. Teaches techniques for creating effective digital audio-visual aids and working with digital audio and video.

COM 131 Fundamentals of Video Production 3 Credits

Introduces students to basic video production theories, techniques, and applications. Students will gain competency in a number of video production areas including: production planning, camera operations, lighting, sound, and digital non-linear editing. Individual and group production exercises will involve planning and executing video productions in both studio and non-studio settings. This class is designed to prepare students from any major to effectively create, produce, shoot, and edit basic video production assignments including public service announcements, video news releases, educational/instructional videos, and marketing/promotional spots.

COM 201 Communication Theory 3 Credits

Explores selected theories, models, and research methods in human communication, the dynamics of the communication process in various settings, and the role of communication in human interaction.

COM 204 Advanced Speech Communication 3 Credits

Provides students with the opportunity to further their study and practice of various types of speech communication. Moving beyond an introductory perspective, this course focuses on the development of critical, analytical, and pragmatic aspects of speech. The focus is divided between the discussion of theoretical models and a demonstrated competence of that material.

Prerequisite(s): COM 104 or COM 290.

COM 205 Theories of Persuasion 3 Credits

Analyzes the motivations that lead individuals and audiences to beliefs and actions and the techniques of achieving objectives through persuasion. Attention, interest, empathy, ethos, fear, and techniques of speakers, and those who use persuasion professionally are studied.

COM 207 Social Media and Social Change 3 Credits

Introduces students to Web/ social media tools and information distribution networks that have enabled people to mobilize new types of collective action, inform publics and advocate positions. Community production and sharing of knowledge (Wikipedia), culture (YouTube, Flickr, the blogosphere), and political organizing (colorofchange.org) are current manifestations of social changes that are continuing to bloom in the 21st century. In this course, Rider University students will become literate in active Web and social media participation with a focus on engaging with current social, political and cultural issues.

Prerequisite(s): COM 201 or COM 205.

COM 210 News Reporting and Writing 3 Credits

Develops skills in hard-news reporting. Employs off-campus reporting assignments to refine information-gathering techniques such as interviewing, observation, and use of government documents and other contextual materials. Includes reporting and writing about police news, state and local government, the criminal justice system, science, business, and sports.

Prerequisite(s): COM 102.

COM 211 Copy Editing 3 Credits

Teaches all phases of copy editing for news and public relations: marking of copy, online editing, fact checking, building and shaping news and feature stories, applying mechanical style, building an ear for graceful English, and safeguarding against legal and ethical problems. Provides comprehensive review of grammar, spelling and punctuation, along with intensive practice in writing headlines and captions and editing wire copy.

Prerequisite(s): COM 102.

COM 212 Publication Design 3 Credits

Explains theories, principles, and techniques of print media layout and design. Provides an understanding of the use of type and art as design elements in various publication formats, such as newspapers, newsletters, advertisements and brochures. Directs students to apply these concepts to the creation of published materials using Adobe Creative Suite.

COM 215 Computer Assisted Reporting 3 Credits

Develops advanced reporting techniques for researching and writing in-depth news stories and investigative articles. Uses state-of-the-art computer-assisted reporting methods including finding and mining data bases on the Internet, creating spreadsheets to analyze data, and employing data base manager software to sort and summarize information in government documents and other specialized resources. Focuses on conceptualizing of story ideas, planning major projects, gathering information by means of data bases, participant-observation, interviews, and analysis of public documents. Emphasizes organizing large quantities of material and presenting it in a meaningful context, including with information graphics.

Prerequisite(s): COM 102 or permission of instructor.

COM 220 Voice and Articulation 3 Credits

Increases the student’s knowledge of the vocal elements of oral communication and improves use of voice and articulation. Introduces anatomy and physiology for enhanced vocal production. Analyzes volume, rate, pitch, quality, phrasing, stress, and inflection. Presents the International Phonetic Alphabet as a means of developing correct articulation and pronunciation. Uses classroom exercises and tape recording for feedback and learning.

COM 230 Radio & TV Communication 3 Credits

Examines the field of electronic communication and its role in society. Scrutinizes the history, technology, structure, and regulation of broadcasting including issues, trends, and the impact of new communication technologies. Introduces basic principles of effective communication in broadcast writing and producing.

COM 233 Writing for Broadcast 3 Credits

Introduces diverse and highly structured writing styles and formats used in writing for broadcast. With focus on effective and creative writing using broadcast style, students will be exposed to the fundamentals of writing dramatic and non-dramatic material for radio and television including station IDs and liners, public service announcements and commercials, news and public affairs programs, and short dramatic and documentary scripts. Through lectures, case discussions, in-class assignments, and critiques, emphasis will be on the practical application of basic rules and conventions common to broadcast writing from copy preparation to on-air delivery.

COM 234 Audio Production 3 Credits

Provides a laboratory study of audio production techniques, and performance. Introduces the fundamental properties of sound as applied in modern audio production at radio and television stations, sound studios, and production houses. Students conduct lab exercises in editing, mixing, and digital recording using ProTools. Students perform a variety of genres including news, commercials, dramas, and promos.

COM 235 Digital Filmmaking 3 Credits

This course will provide students with an introduction to basic narrative film production including theories, techniques and applications. Students will gain competency in a number of film production areas including: idea generation and scripting, production planning, cinematography, lighting, sound and digital editing. Working as individuals and in groups, students will develop and produce short narrative film projects. Students will continue to develop proficiency and mastery of the use of specialized vocabulary of the film industry as well as the ability to analyze film and its narrative structure. In addition students will break down the “narrative” focusing on genre conventions and subtext. Students will additionally examine the relevance of film to society while developing proficiency and mastery in the study of how to create film projects.

COM 236 The Aesthetics of Filmmaking 3 Credits

Introduces students to basic terminology, techniques, theories and criticism commonly used in digital filmmaking. Through lecture, class discussion and screenings, students will learn how film theory, criticism and aesthetics impact the filmmaking process. Students will review and analyze films of different genres; the different approaches adopted by filmmakers; and the various elements and techniques that contribute to the creation of powerful and effective films. Aesthetic elements such as production design, mise en scene, cinematography, lighting, editing, sound design and script development will be introduced and practiced.

COM 240 Public Relations 3 Credits

Introduces current theories and practices of public relations, with emphasis on facilitating two-way communication with various publics. Explores approaches to public relations problems by critically analyzing case studies and applying theories and techniques to realistic situations.

COM 251 Interpersonal Communication 3 Credits

Focuses on the study of various communication concepts and theories and the development of interpersonal skills and sensitivities. More specifically, students will participate in lectures, exercises, and projects while exploring the role and function of relationships in their professional, social, and personal lives.

COM 252 Intercultural Communication 1.5-3 Credits

Develops intercultural communication competence through an awareness and understanding of diverse cultures and their impact on communication. It will introduce students to those general factors that influence communication with people from diverse cultures both internationally and within the United States, and offer a blend of skill development, communication theory, and hands-on application. Note: This course is crosslisted as GLS 252. Students may not get credit for both COM 252 and GLS 252.

COM 253 Organizational Communication 3 Credits

Focuses on the ongoing communication processes in organizations. This course examines how and why organizations develop policies and procedures that both encourage and yet constrain creativity and autonomy in employees. It also introduces various management skills to balance the dynamic in organizations. Finally, the course introduces students to various communication technologies that enable communication processes in organizations. Students will also have opportunities to participate in creating organizational dynamics through role-playing exercises, case studies, and other kinds of experiential learning.

COM 254 Intro to Health Communication 3 Credits

Health communication has been shown to have a positive impact on a number of facets of the medical visit, including patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and job performance and satisfaction. This course will provide students with tools to implement health communication practices in a healthcare setting in order to improve these areas. In addition, health communication is particularly useful in cross-cultural situations, both in regard to the patient-provider relationship, when the ethnicities of the two parties may be different, and when cultural beliefs may impact a patient’s medical wishes. Part of the tools for implementing health communication into the practice setting includes an understanding of the role that culture can play in healthcare and the development of strategies to provide optimal medical care while also respecting cultural intricacies.

COM 261 Web Design I 3 Credits

Introduces students to digital graphics, text, audio and video for Web design using Adobe Creative Suite. Students will learn the basics of audio, video, graphic, and interactive software along with theories of design and perception that underlie effective presentation of digital messages.

COM 262 Graphic Imaging for Digital Media 3 Credits

Teaches students techniques for image development, and image preparation for various multimedia applications. Emphasis is placed on color calibration and palette issues, image manipulation, advanced image selection techniques, transparency and masking, multimedia authoring file formats, and dynamic image design. Students will be expected to participate in critiques of professional designs in order to learn to critically evaluate their work and their fellow students’ work.

Prerequisite(s): COM 261 or permission of instructor.

COM 263 History and Principles of Graphic Design 3 Credits

Covers the history and principles of graphic design from analog art through the digital revolution. The elements and principles of design will be used to study stylistic progressions, artistic techniques, design innovations, and mechanical inventions. Material will be presented through a combination of illustrated lectures and discussions.

COM 264 Intro to Media Convergence 3 Credits

Introduces the ways that the merging of media industries and the intersection and integration of various media platforms and technologies impact our lives. While the primary focus will be on digital and mobile technologies and practices, the course will also cover the convergence of digital technologies in a wide range of media areas, including journalism, social media, television and entertainment. The course will offer students broad conceptual frameworks for thinking about how the emergence and evolution of digital as well as mobile communication technologies have changed the communication and journalism industries and how they are reshaping content. In addition, the course is intended to allow students to use different digital communication technologies.

COM 265 3D Graphic Animation 3 Credits

Provides students with an introduction to the basics of 3D graphic animation techniques including modeling, texturing, rendering, visual effects and animation. Through various projects the students will learn: to model characters, sets and props, how to apply textures and color to their models, and how to bring their creations to life using various animation techniques. In addition to the technical aspects of creating successful animation, the students will also learn the aesthetics of animation in regard to cinematography, art direction, lighting, character creation, prop creation, and set creation, dramatization and narrative.

COM 270 Sports Multimedia Reporting 3 Credits

COM 270 Sports Multimedia Reporting. Develops skills in hard-news sports reporting, game coverage, and the production of introductory multimedia and social media sports content. Employs out-of-the-classroom reporting assignments to refine information gathering techniques such as interviewing, observation, and use of documents and other contextual materials. Includes reporting and writing on sports games, teams, players, coaches, athletic issues/controversies, and the business of sports.

Prerequisite(s): COM 102. Introduction to News Writing.

COM 280 Issues in Event Planning 3 Credits

Offers students education in event planning, production, and supervision for varied professional applications. Emphasis will be placed on planning, budgeting, and organizing small and large events for educational, institutional, non-profit, and professional groups. Students will participate in the entire process of event planning, with specific experiences in applying communication theory to actual projects.

Prerequisite(s): COM 240 or MKT 200.

COM 290 Professional/Strategic Speech 3 Credits

Provides students with practical information necessary for effective communication in various business and professional settings. Covers communication processes, principles, and models in the modern organization. Class assignments are given with emphasis on developing a knowledge and practical understanding of informative, persuasive, and impromptu presentations. Limited to students enrolled in the College of Business Administration.

COM 291 Documentary Film and Video 3 Credits

Surveys the history of documentary film, including reportorial, exploratory, persuasive, symphonic, compilational, reflexive, and fictional traditions through screenings, lectures, and readings. Provides practice in film criticism. Explores philosophical questions about the relationship between non-fiction films and videos and the reality they purport to record. Analyzes ethical problems of filmmaking.

COM 301 Communication Law 3 Credits

Critically examines the legal limits and privileges affecting freedom of expression, especially in publishing, advertising, film, telecasting, and cyberspace. Places particular emphasis on the historical and philosophical foundations of the freedoms and limitations of communication in the United States.

COM 302 Communication Ethics 3 Credits

Analyzes internal and external pressures on the communication professional including economic, cultural, social, and political pressures, assesses the philosophical and practical basis for responding to such pressures, evaluates contemporary media responses to these pressures, identifies those that are of laudable quality and why, and provides guidance as to how individuals and organizations can think and react ethically. Issues addressed include censorship, confidentiality, conflicts of interests, minority and ethnic groups, privacy, sensationalism, and self-criticism.

COM 312 Spe Topics in Jour Writing 3 Credits

Provides students with the opportunity to explore specialized topics in journalistic reporting and writing. Each course will focus on a specific area in the broad field of journalism. Examples include business reporting, health reporting, and sports reporting.

Prerequisite(s): COM 102 or COM 107.

COM 316 Feature Writing 3 Credits

Focuses on problems and requirements of newspaper, magazine, public relations, and free-lance nonfiction writing. Students write features designed for acceptance in print, broadcast and digital media and learn marketing techniques.

Prerequisite(s): COM 102 or COM 107, English writing concentration, or permission of instructor.

COM 318 Gender and Communication 3 Credits

Focuses on interactive relationships between gender and communication in contemporary American society. It connects theory and research with practice to explore multiple ways communication in families, schools, media, and society in general creates and perpetuates gender roles. It is designed to heighten students’ awareness of how we enact socially created gender differences in public and private settings and how this affects success, satisfaction, and self-esteem. Note: This course is crosslisted as GND 318. Students may not get credit for both COM 318 and GND 318.

COM 322 Argumentation and Debate 3 Credits

IInvestigates the theory and practice of speech communication that seeks to persuade by inferential argumentation. Concentrates on theories, practices, and research in argumentation and debate, blended with speaking experience in analyzing and advocating controversial topics.

Prerequisite(s): COM 104 or COM 290.

COM 323 Oral Interpretation of Lit 3 Credits

Provides an orientation to the field of oral performance. Students select literary texts, adapt the material to the audience and prepare it for presentation. Emphasizes the development of voice, articulation, and kinesic behavior. Presentations to the class are critiqued.

Prerequisite(s): COM 104 or COM 290 or permission of instructor.

COM 328 Sitcoms and American Culture 3 Credits

Provides an overview to the unique and highly structured form of the American television situation comedy. The primary focus will be on history and development with in-depth study of situation comedy themes, characters, and settings. Through lectures, case discussions, in-class assignments, and class projects, students will examine the social and cultural meanings and implications of this incredibly popular and durable genre of programming.

COM 330 Documenting Cultures Thru Travel 3 Credits

Offers students, through travel and study, a unique opportunity to gain firsthand experience of a foreign culture and to learn how to record and document their experiences using multiple media, including print, audio, video, photography and/or the Web. While traveling, students will be required to attend lecture/discussion sessions, site tours, and other planned activities. This experience will be preceded and/or followed by additional academic work to be conducted on campus. Study topics may include aspects of the historical, social, economic, political and aesthetic cultural components appropriate to the location(s) to be visited. The travel component of the course will be scheduled to avoid conflict with normal semester offerings. No foreign language skills are required.

COM 331 Television Production 3 Credits

Explores the technological capabilities and limitations of the television medium in team productions using a range of styles and formats. Students learn principles of studio production, electronic field production, and electronic news gathering. Exercises include use of computer graphics, audio production, and non-linear video editing. Stresses electronic communication skills and aesthetic values in a professional production setting.

Prerequisite(s): COM 230.

COM 333 Broadcast Programming 3 Credits

Analyzes the theory, practice, structure, and function of broadcast programming. Examines the structure of the industry as it relates to entertainment, information, and the audience. Studies program categories, formats, genres, trends, consistency, accountability, and ratings as well as cable, satellites, and home video. Critical standards are developed by introducing humanistic and scientific modes of program analysis.

Prerequisite(s): COM 230.

COM 335 Television Field Production 3 Credits

Provides an in-depth study of advanced techniques in Field Production for television. Individual and group field production assignments will involve planning and executing single camera production in a non-studio setting. Previously developed video production skills will be refined, and students will gain increased competency and sophistication in all areas of field production including: production planning, camera operations, lighting, sound, and digital non-linear editing. Designed to prepare students to effectively function in the industry as a member of a professional field production team. In field situations, students create, produce, shoot, and edit documentaries.

Prerequisite(s): COM 331.

COM 337 Music Productn for Mass Media 3 Credits

Offers students education in audio production techniques for music and other advanced audio material. Building on theory and practice introduced in the prerequisite, the class will instruct students in the theory behind acoustics and electronics as well as the digital tools and media. Those theoretical studies will be put to practice through exercises in recording music, making selections from music libraries, multi-track recording, arranging, editing, mixing and mastering. Students will begin to develop both an engineer’s attention to audio detail and a musician’s sense of artistry. Putting these skills to use, the students will produce complete musical works of varying musical styles, working both individually and in teams.

Prerequisite(s): COM 234.

COM 338 Writing for Broadcast II 3 Credits

Building on COM 233 Writing for Broadcast, this course provides a hands-on approach to more sophisticated reporting and interviewing techniques and writing formats used in long-form radio and television programs. This course will expose students to the following broadcast script writing areas: features, documentaries and reality programs. It will also cover writing for interview/talk show programs, music, comedy and variety programs. Students will also be exposed to writing for corporate, educational and children’s programming. Students will have hands-on experiences writing, producing and editing news pieces and webcasts for student and area media outlets and web sites.

COM 341 Publicity Methods 3 Credits

Applies communication theory to writing and editorial processes and production techniques to create public relations materials; includes press releases, industrial publications, social media, trade publications, brochures, newsletters, stockholder reports, and multimedia platforms.

Prerequisite(s): COM 107, COM 240, or permission of instructor.

COM 347 Sports Media Relations 3 Credits

CCritically examines the symbiotic relationship between the mass media and professional sports franchises and major college athletic programs. This course deals with the workings and processes behind executing the proper techniques of sports information and media relations, as well as an analysis of the culture of sports in modern society. Students will develop a practical focus on sports information and promotion, including the role of the sports information director and events promoter, with emphasis on advanced concepts of public relations, publicity and marketing.

Prerequisite(s): COM 240 or permission of instructor.

COM 348 Communication Research Methods 3 Credits

Introduces students to the research methods used to study communication problems and processes. Students will learn how researchers plan and design research studies, explore the methodological considerations of both qualitative and quantitative methods, and have an opportunity to gain hands-on experience in conducting research on communication-related issues.

Prerequisite(s): COM 105.

COM 350 Team & Group Communication 3 Credits

Examines the communication process as it relates to the small group. Theoretical constructs including motivation, group climate, attraction, leadership, decision making, problem solving and roles are analyzed. Utilizes group experience to study and evaluate the dynamics and effectiveness of interpersonal systems.

COM 352 Chinese and American Intercultural Commu 3 Credits

Instructs students about Chinese culture and communication. Culture impacts communication practices and styles in significant and subtle ways. Through readings, lectures, discussions, and first-hand interactions with Chinese international students, the students of this course will gain both conceptual and practical understanding of major communication differences between the two cultures, and become a more skilled intercultural communicator. Note: This course is crosslisted as GLS 352. Students may not get credit for both COM 352 and GLS 352.

COM 353 Nonverbal Communication 3 Credits

Investigates studies in and theories of nonverbal communication. Lectures and experiential activities explore the effect of status, culture, and gender upon kinesics, physical characteristics, proxemics, tactile communication, paralanguages, artifacts, and environmental factors.

Prerequisite(s): COM 104 or COM 290 or permission of instructor.

COM 360 Adv Publicatn Design & Present 3 Credits

Builds on elementary knowledge of graphic design to teach the principles of advanced layout, and computer graphics. Introduces students to industry standard drawing software and builds on their knowledge of layout software gained in the prerequisite course. Provides an understanding of the use of logos, infographics and magazine layout, and of the theoretical bases of color for print production.

Prerequisite(s): COM 212.

COM 361 Photography 3 Credits

Using digital SLR cameras, introduces students to professional methods of shooting varied subjects while applying a range of compositions and styles. Using Photoshop, students edit images for publication in print and on the Internet. Hands-on coursework is grounded in theory, history, aesthetics, and ethics. Some cameras are available for loan from the University.

Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

COM 363 Converging Digital Media 3 Credits

Examines the digital technologies that make up the new world of digital convergence. The course will examine the effects of digital media convergence on social life, ethics, industry, and local and global communities through a variety of theories and paradigms. This course will also help students develop necessary digital media production skills and use them critically to solve media development problems.

COM 364 Web Design II 3 Credits

Equips students with the theories and practical techniques required to produce effective digital text, graphics, and animations for the Web. Discusses theories behind the use of these media in terms of effective communication and interaction. Introduces students to different computer platforms and requirements for cross-platform media.

Prerequisite(s): COM 261 or permission of instructor.

COM 365 Graphic Animation 3 Credits

Offers students education in graphic animation theories, animation development techniques, and animation preparation for various multimedia applications. Emphasis is placed on the design principles in animated communication and animation techniques. The course covers the integration of static images in animation, graphic animation techniques, animation compression, animation rendering, input/output file formats, and animation delivery. The primary software for this course is Adobe Photoshop and Macmedia Flash. Students will be expected to participate in critiques of professional animation designs in order to learn to evaluate critically their own work and their fellow students’ work.

Prerequisite(s): COM 262 or permission of instructor.

COM 366 Project Management in Graphic Design 3 Credits

Explores the creative process of graphic design while developing an understanding of the methods employed in problem solving in the industry standard design software packages. Students learn how to create a hierarchy of information through the ordering of elements into a comprehensive visual unity. They consider the relationship between content and page size, proportion, grid and margins. Students learn about typography as a design element and how it works with other visual elements in design. In order to develop an understanding of the project-planning process for either printer or Web projects, students will develop and present a series of projects that will build on one another to develop their “visual voice.” Students will be evaluated on their ability to apply course material to the projects to create professional-quality work; their ability to apply exchange ideas and accept and apply constructive criticism; and on their participation in class discussions, critiques and presentations.

Prerequisite(s): COM 262, COM 360.

COM 367 3D Graphic Animation II 3 Credits

Continue to learn the techniques of 3D computer animation including modeling, texturing, renduring, visual effects and animation. In addition to the technical aspects of creating successful 3D animation the students will also learn the aesthetics of animation in regard to cinematography, art direction, lighting, character creation, prop creation, and set creation.

Prerequisite(s): COM 265.

COM 370 Sports Television and Field Production 3 Credits

Provides an in-depth study ofadvanced techniques in sports field production for television. Individual and group field production assignments will involve planning and executing single camera production in a sports setting. Previously developed video production skills will be refined, and students will gain increased competency and sophistication in all areas of sports field production including: production planning, camera operations, lighting, sound, and digital non-linear editing. Designed to prepare students to effectively function in the industry as a member of a professional field production team. In field situations, students create, produce, shoot, and edit sports content.

Prerequisite(s): COM 131.

COM 371 Sports Feature Writing 3 Credits

Focuses on developing reporting and writing skills for newspaper, magazine, public relations, and free-lance nonfiction sports writing. Students will study published examples of outstanding sports feature writing, and write their own sports feature articles with social media and multimedia components. Instead of traditional game coverage, this course focuses on covering sports personalities, issues and themes.

Prerequisite(s): COM 102, COM 270.

COM 380 Television Production Practicum 3 Credits

Provides a workshop dedicated to the planning and creation of professional caliber television content for the campus television network and beyond. This course will provide an opportunity for students to develop writing, graphic, audio, video design and production skills in an experiential setting. Students will create materials to be used by the Rider University Network and for broadcast, cable and Internet distribution. Students can be involved in any and all phases of creating content from project conception through implementation. Students will gain valuable experience with, a greater appreciation for, and increased competency in creating professional media content. This class will also prepare students to more effectively function in the communication industry as an effective member of a professional production team. Since topics will vary by semester and instructor, this course may be repeated once.

Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

COM 390 Communication and Society 3 Credits

Examines in a topical manner the influence of communication upon significant issues and movements affecting people and society. Investigates interpersonal and mass media factors as they relate to a major issue such as changing sex roles, radicalism, racism, evangelism, election campaigns, and technology. May be taken more than once with different emphasis.

COM 391 Communication Criticism 3 Credits

Investigates and analyzes various methods of communication criticism and their applications to the understanding and evaluation of public and media discourses. Introduces theories and perspectives to assist in the analysis of those discourses. Methods include Aristotelean, Burkean, and ideological criticism.

COM 392 Media History: Personalities and Trend 3 Credits

Presents in a topical manner the history of the media from various perspectives, seeking to place the material into a meaningful economic, cultural, political, and/or social context. Different issues and related individuals are examined, such as the golden age of radio, motion picture economics, and media empire builders, with a view toward understanding their significant impact on the development and functioning of the media today. This course may be taken more than once with a different emphasis.

COM 393 International Communication 3 Credits

Examines mass media systems and their influence on international communication. Emphasizes media systems of major political powers such as Russia, China, the European community, the United States, and geo-political centers such as Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Using a seminar format, the course explores how a nation’s mass media reflect its socio-political environment and national values. Focuses on the international images constructed by the mass media. Note: This course is crosslisted as GLS 393. Students may not get credit for both COM 393 and GLS 393.

COM 399 The Co-Operative Experience 3-12 Credits

This course provides a significant work experience to support the professional development of the student and complement theoretical and classroom learning. Students will be assessed based on measures as defined in a placement contract mutually agreed upon by the sponsoring faulty member, the organization representative of the placement site, and the student. Approximately 360 hours of work will be required as students work typically four days per week over at least eight weeks. The proposed placement contract requires departmental approval and the approval of the appropriate office of the dean. It is expected that the Co-op program consume the student’s academic load for the semester. Final placement will be determined by the organization where the student will work. Rider University does not guarantee that every student applying for a co-op will earn a co-op placement. Contact the appropriate department for additional information. Prerequisite(s): junior standing and 2.75 GPA at the time of registration; Pass/fail.

Corequisite(s): IND 398 The Co-operative Experience Seminar, IND 398 and (dept) 399 combined cannot exceed 15 credits.

COM 400 Senior Seminar Communication 3 Credits

Provides students with the opportunity to explore critical issues in communication and journalism in a dynamic and engaging context. Students conceptualize problems, develop hypotheses, review literature, design appropriate techniques of inquiry, conduct their research, and present their findings orally to the seminar and in writing to the instructor. Senior journalism and communication majors only.

COM 402 Directing for Film 3 Credits

This course approaches directing both creatively and critically, and examines the role and importance of the director to the filmmaking process. The transformation of the written script into a film is explored through readings, viewing and analyzing the films of accomplished directors. Lectures and exercises illustrated with film clips and readings emphasize plot development, script analysis, developing storyboards and shot lists, rehearsal, blocking, collaborating with talent and production crew, and using the camera to effectively capture action and performance. Students will gain an effective understanding of the role of the director through the various stages of film production, and be provided the opportunity to demonstrate and cultivate his/her effectiveness as a director through individual and group assignments.

Prerequisite(s): COM 235 and COM 338.

COM 415 In-Depth Reporting 3 Credits

Utilizes advanced tools and techniques of contemporary in-depth reporting for print and multimedia. Covering multifaceted stories, students will learn how to do balanced multi-sourced field reporting and writing using primary and secondary sources including human sources, electronic documents and databases, both online and offline. Emphasis will be placed on writing stories that answer not only who, what, when and where questions but also the why, the how and the “so what?” questions. Students will also be exposed to some of the best investigative work of journalists past and present as models for analysis and discussion.

Prerequisite(s): COM 210.

COM 431 Adv TV Research & Production 3 Credits

Explores the theoretical and practical application of aesthetic technique in modern television/video production situations. While the prerequisite courses emphasized competency in equipment operations and basic production skills, this course moves to a higher platform by emphasizing concepts of production and how to apply them for effective communication. Thus this course places emphasis on advanced techniques: design and aesthetics as applied to enhance the overall video presentation as practiced in both the commercial and organizational communication arenas. In the current state of the art of video production, a mastery of aesthetic skills is necessary for the effective expression of ideas in optimal fashion and for a variety of audiences. Students will be exposed to as many techniques as practical through class discussion (including heavy participation by the student), individual and group lab activities and contact when possible with current practitioners and equipment. As most television production is done for a client, that process will form the basis for much of the course discussion and activities including projects.

COM 434 Advanced Radio Production 3 Credits

Provides in-depth study of advanced techniques in audio recording and radio programming and production. Individual and group production of short and long-form radio projects including: promotional spots, features, music programming, and news. Students will be involved in all phases of programming and production for radio including: project conception, development, management, and implementation. Selected student projects will air on the student radio station, 107.7 The Bronc.

Prerequisite(s): COM 234.

COM 435 Advanced Digital Filmmaking 3 Credits

This is an intensive hands-on course in advanced digital filmmaking. Students will gain experience with and proficiencies in a number of filmmaking areas including: creativity, production planning, aesthetics, scripting, script breakdown, camera movement, selecting and directing talent, creating scenes and sequences, visualizing action, establishing mood and conflict, as well as advanced lighting, sound and digital editing techniques. The students’ use of high definition digital imaging systems as a medium for narrative cinematography will be developed and refined. In addition, students will explore how filmmaking techniques and technology can impact the visual story telling process. While often working cooperatively in groups, modeling the interdependent structure of film crews today, the creative and leadership role of the director in the contemporary film industry will be emphasized. Throughout the class, there will be an important integration of theory and practice which will enable students to produce meaningful film projects that will not only be technically effective, but strong in content and context as well.

COM 440 Cases & Campaigns in PR 3 Credits

Critically analyzes public relations case problems in industry, labor, education, government, social welfare, and trade associations. Emphasizes problem solving through the use of communication theories, public relations techniques, creative thinking, and the development of professional goals and standards. Employs realistic simulation exercises and actual case studies to develop and critique students’ ability to demonstrate this knowledge in professional situations.

Prerequisite(s): COM 341 or permission of instructor.

COM 452 Seminar in Communication Studies 3 Credits

Offers an in-depth investigation of relational communication. Students explore the many complexities involved in human interaction and interpersonal dynamics. Social and psychological implications of various communicative relationships ranging from cross-gender communication to dysfunctional family systems to intercultural interactions are included.

Prerequisite(s): COM 348, COM 350, or permission of instructor.

COM 460 Web Design III 3 Credits

Builds on previous courses to refine students’ understanding of theories and procedures of digital media development. Further develops Web site creation and project management theories. Students develop advanced Web creation techniques, including responsible site production.

Prerequisite(s): COM 364.

COM 462 Advanced Graphic Design and Portfolio 3 Credits

Explores the processes of graphic design by creating independent and creative solutions to a series of design problems. Students expand their proficiency in all aspects of the design process, including creative brainstorming, conceptualizing, critical thinking and presentation. Students take a design project to both print and digital formats using Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Students develop and present a balanced portfolio as the culmination of their experience in the course.

Prerequisite(s): ART 103, ART 105, COM 262, and COM 360.

COM 470 Live Sports Reporting Capstone 3 Credits

Focuses on student production of live, professional-level sports media content. Students will combine reporting, writing, social media and multimedia from live sporting events. Live-coverage will include Rider University teams and regional or professional sporting events. The course is open to senior Sports Media Majors, or with the permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): COM 370, COM 371.

COM 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Independent Research and Study allows juniors and seniors in good academic standing to investigate topics of interest under faculty supervision. Projects must be approved by the faculty member, department chairperson, and academic dean no later than the third week of the semester in which the project is to be conducted. Only one project can be scheduled in a semester, and for no more than four semester hours; up to 12 semester hours of independent research and study may be counted toward graduation. Note that individual departments may have additional restrictions.

COM 491 Internship in Communication 1-4 Credits

Places qualified students in a professional area related directly to their communication training. Students may intern in a communication position with a corporation, small business, media outlet, public relations agency, non-profit organization, political party, sports organization, or other similar organizations. A minimum of 50 hours of internship per credit is required. Written reports, a final project, and supervisor evaluations are used to analyze and evaluate the experience. For students majoring in the Department of Communication and Journalism only, primarily juniors and seniors. No more than two internships are permitted for each student; exceptions may be made. The deadline for registration is the first Friday of the semester.

Prerequisite(s): 3.2 GPA and permission of instructor.

POL 100 Intro to American Politics 3 Credits

An examination of basic principles of the U.S. constitutional system; the operation of the democratic process; the organization, powers and procedures of Congress, the presidency and the federal judiciary; and the functions, services, and financing of the national government. Emphasis is on public issues, national priorities, and civil liberties. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 100. Students may not get credit for boh POL 100 and HLS 100.

POL 102 Understanding Politics 3 Credits

Introduction to the study of politics and government, including major political theories and ideologies, systems of government (i.e., presidential, parliamentary, authoritarian, totalitarian), public opinion and behavior, international relations and war, and contemporary policy issues.

POL 200 NJ Government and Politics 3 Credits

Political institutions, processes, and problems of state and local governments of New Jersey. Analysis of legislative, executive, judicial, regulatory bodies, special districts, and autonomous agencies. Aspects of personnel, finance, and services.

POL 201 Policy Issues, Advocy, & Budgt 3 Credits

Surveys various domestic economic and social policy issues, the government budgeting process, and how citizens and groups advocate their interest through organizing, coalition-building and lobbying. Emphasis on developing practical skills in issue analysis, lobbying, legislative tracking, and public budgeting.

POL 202 The Political System - Theories and Themes 3 Credits

This course serves as a gateway to the subfields of comparative politics and international relations. The concept of the political system helps political scientists to organize political interrelations into patterns that allow systematic selection and interpretation of information and the study of processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of settings. The course introduces students to the main brands of normative theory prescribing the principles directing the operation of the political system, to some of the most important methods used to compare political systems and/or their components, and to the foremost approaches utilized in the study of the relations between political systems and their environments. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 202. Students may not get credit for both POL 202 and HLS 202.

POL 203 Homeland Security 3 Credits

The course is designed to help students increase their knowledge and understanding of homeland security policy. The course will consider why and how homeland security problems impact the public agenda, why some solutions are adopted and others rejected, and why some policies appear to succeed while others appear to fail. The course will primarily examine policy making at the national level in the United States, but will also analyze examples at the state and local level, as well as placing U.S. policy in a comparative perspective. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 203. Students may not get credit for both HLS 203 and POL 203.

POL 204 Development and Structure of the US Intelligence Community 3 Credits

This course provides a historical review of intelligence following World War II. It will examine the major functions of intelligence, as well as intelligence as a part of the foreign policy process: collection, analysis, counterintelligence, and convert action. Students will be introduced to a range of collection procedures: human, open source, electronic, photographic, and signal, with emphasis placed on interpreting and writing intelligence summaries. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 204. Students may not get credit for both POL 204 and HLS 204.

POL 210 Public Opinion 3 Credits

Public opinion as a social force and as expression of public sentiment on political and social issues. Topics include: development and dissemination of opinions, the measurement of public opinion, public opinion and governmental processes, and the reciprocal relationship between mass media and public opinion. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 210. Students may not get credit for both POL 210 and GLS 210.

POL 215 Global Politics 3 Credits

The struggle for power, wealth, and order at the global level involving nation-states, intergovernmental organizations (such as the United Nations, the European Union, etc.), non-governmental organizations, transnational enterprises and other non-state entities, using military, economic, diplomatic, legal, and communication instruments. Overview of global problems such as the proliferation of weapons of destruction, ethnic and religious conflicts, human rights, and the global environment at the threshold of the 21st century. Real-time use of the Internet is an integral aspect of this course in terms of readings and assignments. (This course is a prerequisite for POL 295 Special Projects in Political Science: Model United Nations.) Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 215. Students may not get credit for both POL 215 and GLS 215.

POL 216 Comparative Political Systems 3 Credits

A general introduction to types of government and political regimes of the world as they try to cope with the dual challenge of ethnic micropolitics and transnational globalization. Major prototypes of democracy: the British parliamentary system, the American separation of powers system, and various combinations of these two. Traditional autocracy, totalitarian dictatorships, and late 20th-century authoritarian regimes. Students are expected to acquire in-depth knowledge of comparative political systems, and to develop a basic understanding and appreciation of the major concepts and themes in comparative political systems studies.

POL 218 Asian Political Systems 3 Credits

(Formerly the Pacific Rim in the 21st Century) This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of the government, politics, economic development as well as the history and culture of countries along the Pacific Rim. The countries ex-amined include China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, South Korea and North Korea. Students are expected to understand 1) the democratization wave and efforts across the Pacific Rim countries and regions, 2) the economic development of these countries and regions and the consequential sociopolitical impact, and 3) concepts of political institutions and political culture in a comparative perspective.

POL 219 Terrorism,Revolutions and Political Violence 3 Credits

Revolutions are the mad inspiration of history. Trotsky’s characterization calls attention to three important dimensions of violent political participation: the historical settings, ideology, and emotional fervor of the practitioners. The course focuses on these dimensions by analyzing revolutionary and terrorist movements in the 20th century. Special attention is given to the use of violence in the post-Cold War new world disorder. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 219 and as HLS 219. Students may only get credit for one course: HLS 219, GLS 219, or POL 219.

POL 220 Terrorism & Counter Terrorism 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the arguments about the definition of terrorism, the historical use of terrorism and the roles of ideology, religion, and psychological factors that help explain and predict it. The course seeks to identify the components of national security policy aimed at countering such elemetns and their cost, both in financial and civil right terms. Finally, to illuminate both the definition and the policies discussed, the course will offer brief comparisons with other states, especially Israel, the UK, and Russia.

POL 225 Nationalism in World Politics 3 Credits

Nations and nationalism. An overview of nationalistic manifestations in the world today. Nations, states, nation-states. Multinational states, stateless nations. Imperialism, anti-imperialism; nativism vs. internationalism and globalism. Topics include nationalisms in the Holy Land; in the former Yugoslavia; in the former Soviet Union and its successor states; and economic Nationalism vs. Globalization. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 225. Students may not get credit for both POL 225 and GLS 225.

POL 230 Methods of Political Analysis 3 Credits

An overview of the various qualitative and quantitative methods that political scientists use to study their discipline. Themes include analyses of political participation and support, methods of studying elections, measures of political tolerance and liberalism.

POL 235 Race/Ethnicity in Amer Politic 3 Credits

Examines the changing political, economic, and social situation of racial and ethnic groups in American politics since the 1950s. Topics include the relationship between race/ethnicity and voting behavior, political parties, and election results. Includes an analysis of specific areas of contemporary racial and ethnic conflict, such as voting rights, immigration, and affirmative action.

POL 239 Political Thinkers & Thought 3 Credits

A survey of the most significant political thought from ancient times into the modern era. Subject matter includes discussion of such questions as the nature of freedom, natural law and right, constitutionalism, political obligation, justice, form of regime.

POL 247 Political Campaigning 3 Credits

This course entails the study of campaigning for political office at the federal, state and local levels in the United States. While attention will be given to how the broader political environment and specific factors, e.g., the decline in partisanship, hot button issues, local interests, and money, affect the nature of campaigns, the course’s primary focus will be on how to organize and conduct a successful and ethical campaign, including how to collect and analyze pertinent data, manage a staff, develop a communications plan, and get out the vote.

POL 255 European Politics 3 Credits

A comparative analysis of the social and political systems of Britain, France, Germany and other Western countries within the European framework. Emphasis will be on the identification of ways in which countries similar in social characteristics are also similar in their political systems and on the extent and circumstances under which they differ. Similarities and contrasts will also be drawn with political structures and processes in the United States. This course, on occasion, may contain an optional travel component during January.

POL 260 Politics of Law and Order 3 Credits

The constitutional, legal, political, and administrative aspects of the criminal justice system in the United States are studied, including the court system at all levels of government, law enforcement agencies, correctional programs and institutions, probation, parole, and the relationship of our legal institutions to the broader political system.

POL 267 China in Transition 3 Credits

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the history, government, politics, economic development as well as political culture of the People’s Republic of China. Students are expected to acquire in-depth knowledge of China’s political history, government structure and China’s economic development and consequential sociopolitical impact. At the same time, students are expected to develop a basic understanding of the concepts of studying Chinese political institutions and political culture in a comparative perspective.

POL 270 Interest Groups and Lobbying 3 Credits

The course will introduce students to the area of interest groups and lobbying. Topics to be covered include theoretical developments, methodological approaches of group formation, organizational maintenance, and strategies used to influence public policy in the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

POL 272 Politics of Latin America 3 Credits

The course will begin by discussing Latin American nations from the point of view of their common ancestry in European colonization, including the ways in which European cultural and economic patterns were introduced into indigenously populated areas, how these persisted after independence from European imperialist regimes and the U.S., and how these legacies have their continued effects into the present. The course continues with inquiry into the domestic politics and governmental systems of a number of Latin American nations. The course also takes up present day relations between Latin American political systems, the United States, and various organizations of the global economy such as International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization.

POL 280 Sex & Politics 3 Credits

The bearing of gender upon politics: whether political activity is more characteristic of one or the other sex; the comparative fates of male and female in political society; the political implications of change in the content and mutual status of masculinity and femininity. Inquiry into classical, traditional, and contemporary views.

POL 295 Special Project:Model UN 3 Credits

For non-seniors who engage in serious research in political science. Topic to be approved by instructor and department chairperson.

POL 300 U.S. Constitutional Law 3 Credits

The role of the Supreme Court in the American political system is assessed. Topics include the staffing and functioning of the Supreme Court and the federal judicial bureaucracy, the origins and development of judicial review, and the role of the Supreme Court in national policy-making. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 300. Students may not get credit for both HLS 300 and POL 300.

POL 301 Civil Liberties in the U.S. 3 Credits

The American doctrine of civil liberties in theory and practice. Emphasis on analyzing the freedoms of speech, press, assembly, and religion, the right of privacy, and the problem of discrimination in the context of contemporary issues and problems. Particular attention to the role of the Supreme Court in this area. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 301. Students may not get credit for both HLS 301 and POL 301.

POL 304 Political Behavior: Fear, Risk and Crisis 3 Credits

The course focuses on various analytical approaches in behavioral political science. It does so by advancing students' knowledge of the cognitive aspects of whether citizens engage in various types of political behavior-eg. voting/non-voting, the formation of political partisanship and ideology, issue percetions, responding to risk and uncertainty in the political environment, and engaging in civic political participation. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 304. Students may not get credit for both POL 304 and HLS 304.

POL 305 Pol Parties & Electoral Behave 3 Credits

The structure, character, and functions of U.S. political parties and pressure groups, and their impact on public policy. Parties are analyzed within the broader scope of organizational theory and comparative party systems. Major emphases on their historical origins, their role in contemporary political life, and particular aspects of party politics--local organization, membership, campaigning and elections, policy-making roles, and leadership.

POL 306 Political Film 3 Credits

This course analyzes the structure, history, and impact of the genre of political film. It begins with a discussion of how one distinguishes a political film from other forms of cinema. It then proposes insights into the manner in which these films evoke a particular time and place in politics, affect the viewer’s interpretation of a political event or figure, and have an effect upon a viewer’s political perceptions or behavior. The student will also learn to review films critically, both as political statements and as effective (or ineffective) conveyors of political messages. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 306. Students may not get credit for both POL 306 and GLS 306.

POL 307 Political Communication 3 Credits

TThe meaning and uses of political communication are examined, the manner and forms such communication takes, and the history of political discourse. Major topics include the role of communication in elections and the development of public policy, how political communication strategies have changed with the rise of mass media, and the development of national and international publics for discourse. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 307. Students may not get credit for both POL 307 and GLS 307.

POL 309 Will China Be Next Superpower? 3 Credits

This course has two focal points: one is the rise and fall of great powers in the history of world transformation; the other is China's whereabouts in this transition. The former deals with a group of International Relations theories, which focuses on systematic transformation. Students are expected to learn extant theoretical knowledge on how and why a great power rises and falls. The latter is our empirical referent. Students are led to study China's contemporary history, geopolitics, political economy, and international relations as to make a learned connection between theoretical wisdowm and practical data on China. This course will provide students with a better understanding of China in general and its superpower status in the making in world politics in particular, offer students a chance to reveiw the sources and consequences of different national approaches to greatness, and help students find his or her own analytical framework for understanding international political events that may have transforming effects in Northeast Asia as well as on the world stage. This course is cross-listed as GLS 309. Students may not get credit for both POL 309 and GLS 309.

POL 312 Congressional Politics 3 Credits

An intensive analysis of the legislative process in the United States, considering both the internal organization and operation of Congress, and Congress’ role in the broader American political system. Fundamental issues include the theory and practice of representation; the committee system, seniority and expertise; executive and legislative interaction; and the politics of congressional reform.

POL 313 American Presidency 3 Credits

A description and analysis of the American presidency: its historical development, the internal organization, and ecological context. Basic issues include the intent of the framers of the Constitution, the historical accumulation of presidential powers, and institutional limits on presidential power (e.g., Congress and the bureaucracy).

POL 314 Congressional Power and National Security Policy 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is for students to identify, examine, analyze, and interpret the role of Congress in shaping national security policy with a particular emphasis on the institution’s role in the Global War on Terror. Particular attention is paid to the role of the US government being able to balance individual rights and liberties within the national security state. Last, the course also takes an in-depth analysis of the U.S. Congress, looking comparatively at how legislatures in other nations have dealt with crafting their own security policies. The course will address the following questions: First, what is the role of Congress in national security policy, what does it do, and why? Second, what are the various ways of studying the relationship between the legislative and executive branches of government in the US system as it relates to the Global War on Terror? Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 314. Students may not get credit for both HLS 314 and POL 314.

POL 315 Global Issues 3 Credits

Military, economic, demographic, and environmental threats to global security in the post-Cold War era. Forces of transnational integration vs. forces of intrastate fragmentation. Inadequacy of international law and organization to deal with these problems within the confines of the sovereign nation-state system. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 315. Students may not get credit for both POL 315 and GLS 315.

POL 316 Presidential Power and National Security Policy 3 Credits

This course examines the development of the National Security State since the Second World War, and the ways in which it has affected, and been affected by, the Federal Executive. Topics to be covered will include the post-World War II redefinition of “national security”, the Cold War (with a special focus upon war powers during Korea and Vietnam) and the changes that have occurred with the “War on Terror." Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 316. Students may not get credit for both POL 316 and HLS 316.

POL 320 Politics of the Middle East 3 Credits

The course emphasizes the relationships between social and political structures, the role of religion, and the problems of modernization in the Middle East. Similarities and contrasts will be drawn between the Arab and non-Arab countries of the Middle East. The political systems of Egypt, Syria, Israel and Saudi Arabia are examined in terms of political culture, structure, and political processes.

POL 321 International Law 3 Credits

This course covers the basic doctrines of international law and their relationship to the contemporary international community. These include the jurisprudence of international law; the history of the international legal system; customary international law; Treaty law; sovereignty, statehood and recognition; jurisdiction and immunities; the role of international organizations; international criminal responsibility; and the relationship of the international legal system to the U.S. domestic legal system. The objectives of international law are to foster the peaceful settlement of disputes; facilitate transnational communication and commerce; encourage respect for human rights; as well as to preserve the environment. This course is cross-listed as GLS 321. Students may not get credit for both POL 321 and GLS 321.

POL 325 Public Administration 3 Credits

Public administration in modern society, emphasizing the administrative formulation of public policy and its implementation. Attention on who gets what, when, and how from the decisions of administrative units; the role administrators have in policy-making compared to elected legislators, chief executives and judges; the effect administrators have on the benefits citizens receive from government; and the effect administrators have on citizens’ behavior. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 325. Students may not get credit for both HLS 325 and POL 325.

POL 326 Power in American Politics 3 Credits

Examines various explanations of who has power in American politics. Explores the roles of appointed and elected officials, business and interest groups, the media, and the general public in shaping public policy. Special attention to political change, including the impact of broad social movements on the responsiveness of the political system.

POL 327 Contemp Issues Amer Pub Policy 3 Credits

An in-depth examination of current issues in American politics. Drunk driving, political corruption, drug policy, education, and poverty are among the issues to be considered. Emphasis on analyzing policy problems and on developing and evaluating proposed solutions.

POL 328 Environmental Policy 3 Credits

Environmental Politics examines how policymakers deal with the political challenges of unsustainable resource consumption, which is a primary determinant of environmental problems such as climate change, adverse health effects, and biodiversity loss. The course introduces students to environmental politics and policies at the local, state, national, and international levels. The course is designed to provide students with a framework for understanding how varied interests compete within political institutions in order to transform contending ideas into public policy. With that in mind, students will not only become more informed consumers of political information, but will also become more effective at analyzing and advocating for policies as it relates to the environment.

POL 329 Comparative Environmental Policy 3 Credits

Comparative Environmental Policy analyzes cross-national approaches in developing, implementing, and evaluating policy responses to environmental problems. The course analyzes the political factors, actors, and tools that help and explain why some societies have been more likely to develop effective responses to environmental threats. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 329. Students may not get credit for both GLS 329 and POL 329.

POL 335 Urban Politics 3 Credits

Political structure and administration of municipalities in the United States. Emphasis on problems posed by suburbanization, global and regional shifts in business, economic dislocation, housing, race relations, and policing.

POL 340 Mod Democracy & its Critics 3 Credits

The course examines the fundamental assumptions underlying modern democratic theories and the main theoretical attacks launched against them. Among the contending theories to be discussed are right and left-wing anarchism, the old and the new left, fascism, intellectual elitism, and techno-conservatism. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 340. Students may not get credit for both POL 340 and GLS 340.

POL 342 Freedom and Authority 3 Credits

Concepts of freedom and authority in 19th and 20th-century political theory. Emphasis on such important thinkers as Nietzsche, Freud, Sartre, Camus, and Marcuse. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 342. Students may not get credit for both POL 342 and GLS 342.

POL 343 American Political Thought I 3 Credits

The philosophical background and moral principles of American political society: liberty, equality, natural law and natural right; constitutionalism and nation-building. The development of the ideologies of liberalism, conservatism, and libertinism are also covered.

POL 345 Justice 3 Credits

The existence of society over time requires high degree of predictability and hence laws, whether explicit or implicit. These derive their capacity to regulate life from the widespread notion that they are proper and that they should be obeyed. In a word, they accord to our notions of justice. These, however, are not stable. Resting on the understandings of man, society, nature and the relations between them, they develop under the impact of human thought and changing realities. The result is what can be compared to a layered cake. This course treats some of the main contributions made by philosophers from Plato to Rawls to our concept of justice and the manner by which they have shaped our concepts of justice in the US and West in general. Cases in which courts (mainly the US Supreme Court) made use and applied the thinking of earlier philosophies of justice will illustrate the process by which we adjust the boundaries between legality and criminality and determine how we should behave towards each other.

POL 346 Liberal Democracy in Times of 3 Credits

This course inquires into historic and present day cases, ranging across Europe and the US, in which liberal democratic governments, under stress because of subversion, sabotage, invasion, rebellion, or the effects of economically caused chaos, take on emergency powers to become so-called “states of exception.” While in some cases such states have imposed mild and limited emergency measures, others have employed more draconian measures, suspending, if not dissolving, constitutionally guaranteed civil liberties, often for indeterminate and protracted periods. How various states have behaved in emergency situations will be the major content of this course. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 346. Students may not get credit for both HLS 346 and POL 346.

POL 350 U.S. Foreign Policy and Security Policy 3 Credits

Principles, institutions, and processes involved in the formulation and implementation of policies regarding the nation’s military, eco-nomic, and environmental security within the global framework. Strands, trends, and problem areas in U.S. foreign policy, with focus on the changing global environment of the post-Cold War world. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 350. Students may not get credit for both HLS 350 and POL 350.

POL 351 Critical Views of Global Security 3 Credits

This course will examine the foundations of international security. It will examine the concept of security from both the macro and micro level. We will discuss a mix of security strategies (balance of power, alliances, rearmament, collective security, deterrence), theoretical perspective on security (Neorealism, Neoliberalism, Critical Theory, Copenhagen School), great power and third world security, democratic and non-democratic security, classic threats (changes in relative power, proliferation) and new threats (enviroment, population movements, terrorism), and concepts of security ranging from state survial, to societal security, to unit level-variables such as Human Security. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 351. Students may not get credit for both HLS 351 and POL 351.

POL 361 Courts, Judges and Politics 3 Credits

In-depth examination of the nature of judicial decision-making and the impact that judicial decisions have on society. Considers the sources of judicial authority, judicial fact-finding, statutory and constitutional interpretation, individual and collective processes of judicial decision-making, relations between judges and other government officials, and the political consequences of judicial decisions with particular emphasis on federal courts and judges. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 361. Students may not get credit for both POL 361 and HLS 361.

POL 363 Hum Rights in Global Context 3 Credits

Examines human rights – droits de l’homme, derechos humanos, Menschenrechte, “the rights of man” – are, literally, the rights that one has because one is human. What does it mean to have a right? How are being human and having rights related? This course provides an introduction to theory and global practice of human rights. Human rights claims play an increasingly central role in political and social struggles across the world. The adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 signaled a proliferation of international human rights law and transnational non-governmental activism. While the promotion of human rights has become global, adherence to those standards remains highly uneven and gross violations and atrocities continue to occur. Given the breath and complexity of the human rights movement, including its engagement with law, politics and morals, in radically different cultures, this course is by its very nature multidisciplinary. Note: This course is cross-listed as HLS 363. Students may not get credit for both HLS 363 and POL 363.

POL 365 Third World Politics 3 Credits

Studies the major political issues of the Third World. Particular reference to political systems of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East according to the relevance of the examples to large conceptual issues, and according to the major interests of the instructor. Typical issues include neocolonial dependency, the role of the state in newly developed countries, military rule and democratization. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 365. Students may not get credit for both POL 365 and GLS 365.

POL 366 Communist Systems: Politics and Policies 3 Credits

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the origin, development, and history of communism, as well as the current political systems and practices of communist regimes in the world. Students are expected to acquire in-depth knowledge about the origin and development of communism, the influence of communism in world politics, and political systems and policies of contemporary communism regimes. Topics examined include Communist Manifesto, communism in the USSR, communism in China, McCarthyism in the U.S., Cold War, collapse of the USSR, fall of Berlin Wall, and communism in contemporary Cuba and Korea.

POL 367 Politics of Exile, Asylum and Diaspora 3 Credits

This course analyzes mass migrations and refugee movements and what they mean for the stability of nations, the increasing potential of severe culture clashes within societies, and the root causes of (forced) migration movements, such as problems of violence, terror and genocide, as recently seen in Darfur, Rwanda and Bosnia. In certain European countries the frequently failed integration and assimilation policies resulted in an Islamic alienation; terrorist attaches and race riots are some of the consequences. Particular attention will be given to the conflict between the refugees’ and migrants’ needs that result from violent, socio-economic or ecological catastrophes in the countries of origin and the various forms of reception within the host countries. Students will explore theoretical, political, legal, and socio-economic dimensions of the refugee and immigration phenomena in a global world. Other themes will include international human rights and refugee laws, theories of immigration, for example, the feminization of migration, as well as problems of acculturation, assimilation and integration in different host societies. Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 367. Students may not get credit for both POL 367 and GLS 367.

POL 368 International Organizations 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the study of international organizations. The course examines mostly formal and governmental institutions as well as informal institutions or regimes. Topics to be covered include and are not limited to: the establishment of international organizations, evolvement of international organizations, structure of international organizations, decision-making of international organizations and influence of international organizations. This course employs both theoretical and practical approaches in its examination on international organizations. Note: This course is cross- listed as GLS 368. Students may not get credit for GLS 368 and POL 368.

POL 371 The Arab-Israeli Conflict 3 Credits

The course will begin by introducing the main players: the neo-patrimonial Arab regimes on the one hand, and the democratic, economically modern Jewish sector in Palestine on the other. The analysis will focus on the impact of the social, economic, political and religious differences between the sides on their conception of the conflict among the participants and powers outside the region. The course will concurrently examine the impacts of the dynamics of the conflict itself, relations within Islam on the one hand and between Islam and the West on the other. The latter part of the course will consider the sources of perceptual shift that led simultaneously to the narrowing of the conflict with the withdrawal of some of its participants (most Arab states) and its widening with the addition of Al Queada and Iran (via Hezbullah). Note: This course is cross-listed as GLS 371. Students may not get credit for both GLS 371 and POL 371.

POL 399 The Co-operative Experience 3-12 Credits

This course provides a significant work experience to support the professional development of the student and complement theoretical and classroom learning. Students will be assessed based on measures as defined in a placement contract mutually agreed upon by the sponsoring faulty member, the organization representative of the placement site, and the student. Approximately 360 hours of work will be required as students work typically four days per week over at least eight weeks. The proposed placement contract requires departmental approval and the approval of the appropriate office of the dean. It is expected that the Co-op program consume the student’s academic load for the semester. Final placement will be determined by the organization where the student will work. Rider University does not guarantee that every student applying for a co-op will earn a co-op placement. Contact the appropriate department for additional information. IND 398 and (dept.) 399 combined cannot exceed 15 credits. Pass/fail. Prerequisite(s): junior standing and 2.75 GPA at the time of registration.

Corequisite(s): IND 398 The Co-operative Experience Seminar.

POL 415 Political Internship 3-6 Credits

POL 450 Seminar in Poltical Science 3 Credits

A multidimensional framework within which to integrate the variety of perspectives and methodologies extant in the field of political science. Topics for discussion and analysis may range from broad concepts of political discourse such as power and interdependence to specific political issues such as executive-legislative relations and judicial policymaking.

POL 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Independent Research and Study allows juniors and seniors in good academic standing to investigate topics of interest under faculty supervision. Projects must be approved by the faculty member, department chairperson, and academic dean no later than the third week of the semester in which the project is to be conducted. Only one project can be scheduled in a semester, and for no more than four semester hours; up to 12 semester hours of independent research and study may be counted toward graduation. Note that individual departments may have additional restrictions.

POL 491 Internship in Politicl Science 1-4 Credits

Students work under supervision in a public agency, political party, or public interest group. A minimum of 52 hours of fieldwork per credit required, with regular reports and a concluding critique analyzing and evaluating the experience. Primarily for seniors and qualified juniors. No more than six credits allowed toward graduation.

Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

POL 499 Senior Honors Thesis 3-6 Credits

Majors having completed the department’s core requirements and having a minimum GPA of 3.5 in political science courses may apply for honors in their sixth semester. Applicants enroll in POL 490 Independent Research and Study in their seventh semester to develop and submit a thesis proposal to the department. With departmental approval, applicants prepare an honors thesis in their last semester. Upon acceptance of the thesis by the department, the student will be graduated with honors in political science.

POL 501 Homland Security 3 Credits

This course is designed to help students increase their knowledge and understanding of problems impact the public agenda, why some solutions are adopted and other rejected, and why some policies appear to succeed while others appear to fail. The course will primarily examine policy making at the national level in the United States, but will also analyze examples at the state and local level, as well as placing U.S. policy in a comparative perspective.

POL 502 The Development and Structure of U.S. Intelligence Agencies 3 Credits

This course will provide an historical review of intelligence during the following World Wall II. It will examine the major functions of intelligence, as well as intelligence as a part of the foreign policy process: collection, analysis, counterintelligence and convert action. Students will be introduced to a range of collection procedures: human, open source, electronic, photographic, and signal. With emphasis placed on interpreting and writing intelligence summaries.