Science for Business

Program Overview

The Science for Business minor provides students in the College of Business Administration with a background in science to enhance opportunities for careers in healthcare and pharmaceutical industries such as sales, marketing and product development.  Science for business enriches a students' analytical and research skills which can be utilized in any given career path.   

Minor Offered

  • Minor in Science for Business

Contact

E. Todd Weber, Ph.D.
Professor and Chairperson of Biology
Science Hall 339C
609-896-5028
tweber@rider.edu

Program Website: Science for Business Program
Associated Department: Biology Department

Related Programs 

Requirements for the Minor

(20 credits)

Note: A grade of “C” or better in each course is required for successful completion of the minor.

Introductory Biology Course
Select one of the following:3
Life Science:Human Emphasis
Life Science:Genetics Emphasis
Life Science:Human Disease
Life Sci: Biol of Human Aging
Life Science: Behavioral Neuroscience Emphasis
Introductory Chemistry Course
CHE 115Chem and Contemporary Society3
Science as Business Course
BIO 206The Pharmaceutical Industry3
Biology or Behavioral Neuroscience Courses
Select any two courses with the following recommended:8
Principles of Biology I
and Principles of Biology I Lab
Principles of Biology II
and Principles of Biology II Lab
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
and Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab
Human Anatomy & Physiology II
and Human Anatomy & Phys II Lab
Genetics
and Genetics Lab
Behavioral Neuroscience
and Behavioral Neuroscience Lab
Health Care Business Course
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Health Care
Healthcare Law,Ethics & Polcy
Economics of Health Care Sys
Total Credits20

BIO 100 Life Science:Human Emphasis 3 Credits

An examination of mammalian physiology and development at the cellular and organ system level, with emphasis on physiological homeostasis in man. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 101 Life Science:Genetics Emphasis 3 Credits

An examination of cell biology and genetics, with emphasis on the impact of these fields on human affairs. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 106 Life Science:Human Disease 3 Credits

An introduction to molecular, cellular, and human biology with emphasis upon diseases and disorders caused by mutation, bacteria, viruses, or parasites. The biology of human aging is also discussed. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 108 Life Science: Biology of Human Aging 3 Credits

An introduction to the biology of aging manifest in the cells, tissues, and organs of animals and humans. Three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 115 Principles of Biology I 4 Credits

An introductory biology course focusing on major themes of biology: what is life?; Cells as fundamental structure and functional unit of life; information transmission, storage and retrieval; Diversity and unity of life explained by evolution. Three hours of lecture and one three- hour lab per week.

Corequisite(s): BIO 115L.

BIO 115L Principles of Biology I Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 115.

BIO 116 Principles of Biology II 4 Credits

An introductory biology course focusing on major themes of biology: Energy and matter to carry out life's essential functions; Interdependent relationships characterize biological systems (homeostasis, growth & development); Behavior of living things; Ecology and the environment. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week.

Corequisite(s): BIO 116L.

BIO 116L Principles of Biology II Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 116.

BIO 206 The Pharmaceutical Industry 3 Credits

An introduction to drug discovery and development. Topics include how drugs are used to diagnose, cure, treat, and prevent disease and how drugs affect body function. The origins of diseases and the early attempts at treatment are also covered. Designed for business majors; does not satisfy requirements for the biology major.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 100 or BIO 101 or BIO 106 or BIO 108 or BNS 107 or CHE 115.

BIO 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 Credits

A comprehensive survey of the structure and function of musculo-skeletal systems, neuroendocrine systems and related tissues and cellular interactions. Physiological applications include homeostasis, muscle dynamics, and cell activities. Laboratory exercises complement lecture material through the use of animal dissections, wet labs, computer-assisted investigations, microscopy, and models. Exams, case histories, personal investigations, and lab practicums assess learning. Course emphasis supports allied health and pre-professional training. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Designed for allied health students; does not satisfy requirements for the biology major. Prerequisite(s): HSC major ONLY or Permission of instructor.

Corequisite(s): BIO 221L.

BIO 221L Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 221.

BIO 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 Credits

A comprehensive survey of the organ systems of the body including special senses, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproduction and development. Physiological components include electrolytes, metabolism, nutrition, and the mechanisms of homeostasis and cell reception. Lab studies support lecture material through dissections, wet labs, computer-assisted learning, microscopy, and models. Assessment includes lab practicums, exams, and reports. Course emphasis supports allied health and pre-professional training. Designed for allied health students; does not satisfy requirements for the biology major. Prerequisite(s): BIO 221.

Corequisite(s): BIO 222L.

BIO 222L Human Anatomy & Phys II Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 221L.

Corequisite(s): BIO 222.

BIO 265 Genetics 4 Credits

A comprehensive course focusing on molecular, Mendelian, and population genetics. Topics covered will include molecular advances in the study of genetics, including genomics and bioinformatics; evolution and the effects of genetic mutations; the application of population genetics to forensic science; genetic problem solving, including genetic crosses and statistical analysis; and regulation of gene expression. The laboratory for this course will introduce students to commonly used genetic model organisms and basic molecular biology techniques. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115, BIO 116 and (BIO 260 or BIO 117) with a grade of C or better in each course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 265L.

BIO 265L Genetics Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BIO 265.

BNS 107 Life Science: Brain and Behavior 3 Credits

An introduction to the biology of the human brain and the rest of the human nervous system. Topics in neuroscience are covered in molecular, cellular, and systematic terms. Additional material is presented on the origins and effects of neurological and psychiatric diseases.

BNS 275 Behavioral Neuroscience 4 Credits

An introductory behavioral neuroscience course including basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of movement, ingestive, reproductive, emotional, and learning behaviors. Emphasis is on the structure/function relationships that allow animals to make appropriate physiological and behavioral responses to the environment. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 115 & BIO 116.

Corequisite(s): BNS 275L.

BNS 275L Behavioral Neuroscience Lab 0 Credits

This lab is a co-requisite and must be taken with the corresponding course.

Corequisite(s): BNS 275.

CHE 115 Chem and Contemporary Society 3 Credits

Designed to give the nonscientist an appreciation of the role of chemistry in today’s world. The approach is conceptual rather than mathematical. Topics include basic principles of chemical theory, energy sources, elementary organic chemistry, drugs, food additives, polymers, chemistry of living systems, inorganic solids in modern technology, and problems involving pollution of the environment. Three hours of lecture per week. This course satisfies the core requirements for liberal arts, education and business majors.

HTH 205 Introduction to Health Care 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the components of the health care industry in the United States and to the interactions of these components in producing and supplying health care. We examine the nature of health, and the various institutions and personnel which seek to provide health services; we explore the means by which we pay for these services; we assess the relationship of technology to provision of health care services; we study the various ways that our government interacts with the providers of health care services; we investigate the ethical implications of issues in health care; and we explore health care sectors from an international perspective.

HTH 315 Health Care Law, Ethics and Policy 3 Credits

This course analyzes the role of the law in promoting the quality of health care, organizing the delivery of health care, assuring adequate access to health care, and protecting the rights of those who are provided care within the health care system. It will also examine the public policy, economic, and ethical issues raised by the health care system.

HTH 336 Economics of Health Care System 3 Credits

This course presents ways in which economic analysis can be used to explain issues in the health care industry. Microeconomics tools will be used to describe the behavior of consumers, producers, and third parties of the health care sector. The course also investigates the role of government in regulating the health care sector, and in providing services to the poor and elderly. Finally, we will use this foundation to examine some recent changes in this industry, and to analyze the most recent proposals for further changes.