Business Administration (B.S.B.A)

Program Overview

Rider’s business administration major provides students with a general business focus, and is ideal for students who do not want to concentrate in a particular functional area, but instead intend to pursue one of the following goals: attend graduate school, such as law school or a MBA or Ph.D. program, enter a management training or marketing program with a future employer and/or  enter a family business or start a new one.

Curriculum Overview

The Business Administration major requires completion of 18 credit hours of upper-level business courses across a variety of disciplines, including: economics, finance, management and marketing and more.  For graduation students must achieve an overall GPA of 2.0 in the major.  Business Administration majors may not count more than six credit hours toward a second major, with the exception of International Business.  Students majoring in Business Administration can count up to nine credit hours toward the International Business major.

Degree Offered

  • B.S.B.A. in Business Administration 

Contact

Boris Vilic
Dean, College of Continuing Studies
Bart Luedeke Center
609-896-5033
ccs@rider.edu

Program Website: Business Administration
Associated Department: Marketing, Advertising and Legal Studies

Related Programs

Business Core75
See Business Core Requirements
Major Requirements
One upper-level economics elective3
One upper-level finance elective3
One upper-level management or human resources elective3
One marketing elective3
Select two upper-level business electives that may include:6
BUS 491Business Admin Internship
or BUS 490 Independent Research and Study
Free Electives27
Total Credits120

Courses listed in the business core may not be used for filling the requirements of the business administration major.

ECO 200 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Credits

A collective view of income receiving and spending sectors of the national economy, including households, businesses, and governments. Issues discussed: What determines the level of output, income, and employment achieved by the economy? What determines the growth of national output and employment? National income accounting, income and employment theory, monetary system, general price level, business cycle, government policies designed to provide for full employment, price stability, and economic growth are also covered.

Prerequisite(s): Place into MSD 105 based on SAT or ACT Score, OR place into MSD 105/MTH 102 by passing College Placement, OR passing MTH 100S with a grade of ‘Y’, OR passing MSD 104, OR having transferred in any college level MSD or MTH class.

ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics 3 Credits

Market price systems are analyzed. The nature and characteristics of consumer and producer behavior, the theory of pricing in competitive and noncompetitive markets, and determination of the distribution of output a re evaluated. Welfare, social control, monopoly, and income inequality a re explored in the light of price theory. The role of the United States in the world economy is explored.

Prerequisite(s): Place into MSD 105 based on SAT or ACT Score, OR place into MSD 105/MTH 102 by passing College Placement, OR passing MTH 100S with a grade of ‘Y’, OR passing MSD 104, OR having transferred in any college level MSD or MTH class.

ECO 210 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 Credits

An analytical study of modern aggregate economic theory. Emphasizes the measurement and determination of income, employment, and price levels, as well as economic policy in theory and practice.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200 and ECO 201.

ECO 211 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 Credits

This course is designed to give the student a thorough understanding of microeconomic theory. As such, the course will analyze the behavior of both consumers and producers, and how this behavior determines the price and quantity observed in the market. The course objective is to provide students with the necessary theoretical background to enable them to solve meaningful and practical problems. Thus, the course is both theoretical and applied in its orientation. The course will emphasize that economic theory can be used not only to solve market oriented problems, but social and public policy problems as well.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200 and ECO 201.

ECO 300 Bus Conditns Analysis/Forecast 3 Credits

Business conditions change daily. Students study them as they change, learning to understand them in the light of economic theory, learning how each part of the economy is affected, and learning the advantages and limitations of the most reliable forecasting methods.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200, MSD 201.

ECO 301 Managerial Economics 3 Credits

Intensively examines the theory of the firm with applications to the solution of such managerial problems as demand forecasting, the nature and behavior of costs, and product pricing. Introduces the use of simple mathematical and statistical tools that are employed with economic analysis for solving managerial problems.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200 and ECO 201 and MSD 201 or permission of instructor.

ECO 305 Internatl Trade and Investment 3 Credits

Studies the theory, institutions, and structures underlying the international flow of trade and investment. Topics are: the theory of international trade; balance of payment analysis; the international monetary system; adjustment to balance of payment disequilibrium; regional economic integration; the economic effects of trade restrictions; and trade and foreign investment problems of developing nations.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200 and ECO 201.

ECO 315 Comparative Economic Systems 3 Credits

Provides a conceptual framework for classifying and comparing economic systems. Presents theory of the capitalist market economy and case studies of the U.S., Japanese, French, and Swedish economies. Examines theory of the centrally planned economy, its transition, and case studies of the Soviet and its successor states, Chinese, and East European economies. Case studies are necessarily limited, concentrating on selected topics, such as transition strategies, industrial policy, etc.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200 and ECO 201.

ECO 325 Industrial Organization 3 Credits

Explores the relationship between market structure and performance. Topics include concentration in individual industries, product differentiation and entry barriers, pricing and marketing policies, and antitrust policies and their consequences.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200 and ECO 201.

ECO 326 Economics of Sports 3 Credits

The overall objective of this course is to deepen student understanding of microeconomic principles by applying microeconomic concepts to the analysis of professional and amateur sports. This course will utilize concepts from many different microeconomic specialties, (primarily Industrial Organization, Labor Economics and Public Finance). The tools from these different microeconomic fields will be used to explain and analyze the operation of professional sports teams and leagues in the U.S. with an emphasis on baseball, football, basketball and hockey. International comparisons will be made between professional sports in the U.S. and the rest of the world. The course will also analyze the not-for-profit sports sector, focusing on college sports and the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

Prerequisite(s): EC0 201.

ECO 330 Labor Market Analysis 3 Credits

Intensive study of the economics of the labor market, which examines the determinants of labor supply and demand, and market equilibrium in the labor market. This enables the student to understand what determines wages, labor force participation, occupational choice, the extent of education and training, unemployment, poverty, union membership, and discrimination in the labor market.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200 and ECO 201.

ECO 335 Economics of the Public Sector 3 Credits

Analyzes the economic roles of government: allocation; distribution; and stabilization. The course examines the tools used by governments, especially the federal government, such as taxation, expenditures, regulations and laws in order to achieve economic goals. The course will give special attention to social regulation.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 200 and ECO 201.

ECO 336 Economics of Health Care Sys 3 Credits

This course presents ways in which economic analysis can be used to explain issues in the health care industry. Microeconomic tools will be used to describe the behavior of consumers, producers, and third parties of the health care sector. The course also investigates the role of government in regulating the health care sector, and in providing services to the poor and elderly. Finally, we will use this foundation to examine some recent changes in this industry, and to analyze the most recent proposals for further changes.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 201 or HTH 205.

ECO 365 Post-Soviet Economy 3 Credits

Studies the contemporary post-Soviet economic system, with emphasis on institutions, policies and issues related to business opportunities in this area. Topics covered include the historic, geographic, political, and cultural setting, planning and plan implementation in the traditional system, current reforms and prospects for the future, with special reference to the foreign trade institutions and experience of foreign firms doing business in the post-Soviet Union and Eastern European countries.

Prerequisite(s): EC0 200 and EC0 201 or permission of instructor.

ECO 450 Seminar in Economic Research 3 Credits

Students in the course learn to conduct economic research by engaging in an actual community-based research project. At the beginning of the semester, students are assigned to a community-based organization. As a team, students meet with the client, devise a plan of action, collect and analyze data and other information, and write a report to the client. At the end of the semester, students present their findings to the client. Students are permitted to take EC0 450 up to two times for credit.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

ECO 490 Independent Research and Study 3 Credits

Topic to be approved by professor and chairperson. Available for juniors and seniors. No more than 12 credits allowed toward graduation.

ECO 491 Internship/Independent Study 3 Credits

This course is available to qualified economics majors and minors. Evaluation is based on a performance appraisal provided by the participating firm and a project/paper judged by the major’s internship director. This course can be used as a business or free elective. Grading is done on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

FIN 200 Managing Your Money 3 Credits

An introduction to the analysis of a wide range of financial decisions which individuals encounter over their careers and lifetime. Topics include financial goals, tax planning, home ownership versus renting, consumer credit, money management and investments, and managing risk with insurance. This course is open to all Rider students, and it counts as a free elective or a business elective. It cannot be used as finance elective.

FIN 220 Introduction to Finance 3 Credits

An introduction to the environment, concepts, and techniques of financial management. Topics include forms of business organization, taxes, analysis of financial performance, financial planning, financial markets and interest rates, time value of money, bond and stock valuation, risk and return, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and international financial management.

Prerequisite(s): ACC 210 and ECO 201.

FIN 305 Personal Financial Planning 3 Credits

This course focuses on practical issues and problems involving personal financial budgeting, use of credit, selection of banking services, insurance needs, real estate, investments, tax planning, and retirement planning. An important objective of the course is to provide the student with the tools that are utilized in making personal financial decisions and how to apply those tools for a variety of financial needs.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 307 Financial Markets & Institut 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the organization and behavior of financial markets and institutions in the economy. The factors determining security prices and interest rates in the money and capital markets are analyzed. An overview of all major financial institutions is presented. In addition, market returns, the regulatory environment, and monetary policy are examined.

Prerequisite(s): EC0 200 and junior standing.

FIN 308 International Finance 3 Credits

Financial management in the international environment. Topics include balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, arbitrage, hedging of currency risk, country risk management, and the evaluation of foreign investment opportunities.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 309 Intermediate Corporate Finance 3 Credits

This course builds on and extends the concepts of financial management learned in FIN 220. The course examines long-term corporate financing and investment decisions and how those decisions interface with each other. Topics covered include: cost of capital, financial planning and analysis, capital budgeting, capital structure and dividend policy.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 312 Investments 3 Credits

The fundamentals of investing in stocks, bonds, and other negotiable instruments are covered. Major topics include trading on securities markets, mutual funds, international investing, margin accounts, short sales, determinants of securities prices, and investment risks. Stock options, financial futures, convertible securities, and implications of taxes on investment decisions are also discussed.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 315 Financial Modeling 3 Credits

Provides instruction in computer use beyond what is available in other finance courses. Topics include more sophisticated applications of computers in financial management, investments, and other areas of finance and business. Students work on cases and projects which require more advanced usage of spreadsheets and other software and databases.

Prerequisite(s): CIS 185 and FIN 220.

FIN 330 Corporate Cash Management 3 Credits

This course is designed for business students seeking an understanding of modern principles and techniques for corporate treasury management. The course material is useful for finance, accounting, and banking professionals or small business owners. Topics include analysis of liquidity and solvency, credit and accounts receivable management, cash collection and disbursement systems, short-term investment and borrowing, management of treasury information and technology, multi- national cash management, and other related topics.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 340 Risk Management 3 Credits

This course examines the risk management process as applied to the firm as a whole. It integrates the management of all risks facing the firm: strategic, financial, hazard, and operational. Techniques for identifying risk, measuring and analyzing it, and selecting an appropriate treatment will be explored.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 350 Entrepreneurial Finance 3 Credits

This course covers the techniques for acquiring financial resources as a firm advances through successive business stages: seed, start-up, struggling, growing, and stable. In addition, it examines recent trends in credit markets and the latest financial innovations as they impact the process of financing the venture’s growth.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 360 Fixed Income and Derivatives 3 Credits

This course centers on the quantitative portion of the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) level 1 curriculum, which includes materials on fixed-income risk and return, fundamentals of risk analysis, derivative instruments and risk management applications of option strategies. The goal is to help students prepare for the exam, as well as introduce them to a variety topocs in finance.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 312.

FIN 370 Financial Analysis and Ethics 3 Credits

This course covers the topics of financial reporting and analysis and related ethical issues. The course would benefit students interested in augmenting their ability to understand, analyze and apply the information in financial statements. It provides essential knowledge for students seeking either the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) or Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) certifications. Specifically, the course covers the Ethics and Professional Standards of the CFA curriculum, and materials on financial reporting quality and financial statement analysis. Course goals are to help students prepare for the certification exams, as well as introduce all interested students to a variety of topics in financial analysis and ethics.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 312 or POI.

FIN 380 Real Estate 3 Credits

Real estate finance and related subjects in real estate are examined. Topics include measuring cash flows and taxes, valuation methods for real estate investment decisions, location and value in real estate, home ownership, legal matters, and financing methods and techniques.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 399 The Co-Operative Experience 6 Credits

The co-op program provides students with an opportunity to work full-time in a company and apply what they have learned in their finance and other business classes. It also enhances students’ employment opportunities since many employers use a co-op program as a first step before they hire full¬ time employees. Eligible students include finance majors with at least junior status, a minimum overall GPA of 3.0, and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in any finance coursework completed prior to the submission of the co-op application. Co-op credits can be applied toward business or free elective requirements but not toward finance elective requirements for majors. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 220.

FIN 412 Investment Analysis 3 Credits

Real-world application of the concepts and techniques of investment analysis and portfolio theory introduced in FIN 312. Students interact with and make recommendations to professional portfolio managers. Topics include analysis and forecasts of business conditions, market interest rates, international opportunities, and corporate profits. Emphasis is placed on the valuation of securities, stock selection, investment timing, technical analysis, and management of portfolio risk with options, futures, and other tools.

Prerequisite(s): FIN 312 or permission of instructor.

FIN 469 Special Topics in Finance 3 Credits

This course is occasionally offered, with the topics and prerequisites set by the finance program.

FIN 490 Independent Research and Study 3 Credits

Topic to be approved in advance by supervising instructor, chairperson, and academic dean. Available for juniors and seniors. No more than 12 credits allowed toward graduation. This course can be used as a business or free elective, but with prior approval it can also be used as finance elective.

FIN 491 Finance Internship 1-3 Credits

The internship offers qualified junior and senior finance majors supervised employment with participating companies. The internship may be taken during the fall or spring semester or during the summer session. Students are evaluated periodically by senior staff members of the participating firms and are required to complete a term paper that will be reviewed by the major’s internship director. Internship credits can be applied toward business or free elective requirements but not toward finance elective requirements for majors. Grading is on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisite)s): permission of instructor.

HRM 312 Intro to Labor Relations 3 Credits

This course deals with the relationship of labor unions and management, the fundamentals of collective bargaining, and labor legislation. The structure and growth of unions as well as the relationships and problems that exist among private and public sector organizations, the labor force, and government are surveyed.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310 or permission of instructor.

HRM 313 Legal Aspects of Human Res Mgt 3 Credits

This course deals with the various laws that affect human resource management, including social insurance, legislation, minimum wage laws, OSHA , ERISA, as well as equal employment opportunity legislation. This course is concerned not only with the provisions of these laws, but also with their constitutionality, their effects, and how they are administered.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310 or permission of instructor.

HRM 315 Employee Selection & Training 3 Credits

This course explains the processes involved in selecting and training employees. With regards to selection, specific examples include, evaluating applicant credentials, administering pre-employment tests and complying with equal employment opportunity legislation. With regards to training, topics include assessing the need for training, designing effective training programs, utilizing methods such as technology to deliver training, and evaluating the effectiveness of training programs.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310.

HRM 316 Employee Compensation Systems 3 Credits

The goal of this course is to familiarize you with the common methods of compensation used by today’s organizations and how these methods could be used to increase motivation, job satisfaction, and performance in the workplace. To accomplish this, we will first discuss the bases of motivation in the workplace. Next, we will then talk about the various compensation options and techniques and the strengths and weaknesses of each in maximizing motivation and performance in an organization.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310.

HRM 333 Employee Engagement 3 Credits

Employee Engagement is commonly described as a focused passion and enthusiasm that employees bring to their work that produces high-quality performance and positive organizational outcomes such as enhanced firm reputation, customer loyalty, and profitability. In this course, students will explore the concept and value of Employee Engagement, and strategies for energizing an organization's workforce. Projects and activities will focus on the role of the Human Resource function in measuring employee attitudes, designing relevant interventions, and influencing a culture of engagement.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310.

HRM 441 Sel. Topics: Human Res Mgt 3 Credits

Deals with one area of study in the field of human resource management such as protective labor legislation, mediation and arbitration, the administration of labor unions, or case problems in human resource management. The topic varies each semester and is announced at the time of registration.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310 or permission of instructor.

HRM 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Topic to be approved in advance by supervising instructor, chairperson, and academic dean. Available for juniors and seniors. No more than 12 credits allowed toward graduation, and can be used as free elective or HRM major elective.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310 or permission of instructor.

HRM 491 Internship 1-4 Credits

Provides the student with the opportunity to supplement and apply human resource management coursework in a supervised employment setting with participating companies. Requirements include a journal with a log of daily activities and a paper summarizing work experiences. Students will receive a letter grade based upon their internship performance, as well as their performance on the journal and final paper submissions.

Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior; Major in human resource management and MGT 310; Requires a 2.75 GPA overall and 3.0 GPA in the major and permission of the instructor.

HRM 492 Internship in Human Res Mgt 3 Credits

Provides the student with the opportunity to supplement and apply their human resource management classroom work in a supervised employment setting with participating companies. Requirements include a journal with a log of daily activities and a paper summarizing their experiences submitted to the internship supervisor. Students will receive a letter grade based upon their internship performance, as well as their performance on the journal and final paper submissions. 2.75 GPA overall and 3.0 GPA in the major is required.

Prerequisite(s): major in human resource management or management and leadership, and MGT 310; senior status; and permission of instructor.

MGT 201 Fund Management & Org Behavior 3 Credits

This course deals with the fundamentals of organizational behavior as they relate to management such as motivation, communications, and leadership. Behavior is examined at the individual, group, and organizational level. The management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling are addressed. The effects of global operations and the requirements of ethical behavior on managers are also explored.

Prerequisite(s): minimum 30 credits completed.

MGT 310 Intro to Human Resource Mgmt 3 Credits

This course deals with the nature of human resource management, its functions, procedures, and practices currently found in profit, non-profit and public sector organizations. Topics covered include recruiting and selection, t raining, human resource development, equal employment opportunity, performance appraisal, diversity, job analysis, compensation, and employee rights and discipline.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 320 Managing Workforce Diversity 3 Credits

Demographic shifts, changing patterns of labor force participation, global competition, and a growing cultural emphasis on the celebration of difference have all contributed to the creation of diversity as a hot topic in management. This course explores the opportunities and challenges of the increasingly diverse workforce emerging in the United States today. We will address the knowledge and skills managers must develop in working with others who are different from themselves. Some of these differences are obvious- gender, race, age, and physical characteristics. Other differences are not as easily observed - family structure, educational level, social class, and sexual orientation. This class incorporates experiential learning techniques for personal growth.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 336 Career Management 3 Credits

How careers are shaped by individual needs and experience and assisted by organization systems and practices is the focus of this course. The meaning of work and the development of careers are discussed, and students undertake self-assessment for the purpose of career planning. Careers are examined in the context of important changes occurring today in the world of work. The impact of the executive, organizational counselors and trainers, and the educational system upon the development of human potential is examined, along with the techniques for human resource planning and development.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 346 Negotiation 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is first, to explore the major concepts and theories behind effective negotiating practices and second, to develop negotiating skills applicable to a wide range of contexts. A knowledge of negotiation is a crucial requirement for anyone interested in a business career since it is a common mechanism for implementing change and for resolving conflict in the workplace. Topics will include two-party negotiations, power and politics, mediation, arbitration, and collective bargaining. A variety of teaching techniques will be used including readings, discussion, and role-playing.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of the instructor.

MGT 355 Team Management 3 Credits

This course prepares students to work in organizations that use teams as an integral part of their functioning-an increasingly common practice. The class involves intensive group interaction, focusing on individual growth in group settings. Working with other students in role-plays, exercises, and team assignments allows the student to develop better communication and leadership skills.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 363 Management Skills 3 Credits

The focus of this course is on specific skills necessary for success in a management role. These skills include leading, communicating effectively, delegating, conflict and time management and motivating others. Students will have opportunities to practice skills and to apply their knowledge to business cases.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 375 International Management 3 Credits

This course explores the ways in which culture impacts management practices and organizational behavior and dynamics. Topics include cross cultural communication, expatriate selection and training, leading and motivating cross cultural teams, developing organizational strategies to compete in a global market place, international business ethics, and current topics.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201.

MGT 421 Sel Topics:Mgt & Organztn Behv 3 Credits

The seminar focuses on an area of study announced at the time of registration (students should check the registration material). Examples of possible topics are: leadership, motivation, and organizational behavior research. Prerequisites vary according to the topic and are listed in the registration material.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 448 Sem Small Bus Consul 3 Credits

This course utilizes student teams to assist existing small businesses in solving problems or researching opportunities. Students will spend the majority of time in the field utilizing an experiential learning approach. Weekly activity logs, proposal development, and project completion are required. Restricted to seniors.

Prerequisite(s): ENT 348 and permission of instructor.

MGT 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Topic to be approved in advance by supervising instructor, chairperson, and academic dean. Available for juniors and seniors. No more than 12 credits allowed toward graduation, and can be used as free elective or MGT major elective.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 491 Intern Management/Org Behavior 3 Credits

Provides the student with the opportunity to supplement and apply their management and leadership classroom work in a supervised employment setting with participating companies. Requirements include a journal with a log of daily activities and a paper summarizing their experiences submitted to the internship supervisor. Students will receive a letter grade based upon their internship performance, as well as their performance on the journal and final paper submissions.

Prerequisite(s): major in management and leadership or human resource management and MGT 363, or senior status; Requires a 2.75 GPA overall and 3.0 GPA in the major and permission of the instructor.

MKT 200 Marketing Principles 3 Credits

This course examines market characteristics, consumer buying habits and motives, and functions of marketing within the framework of the strategic marketing planning process. Concepts and current practices in product development, pricing, promotion, distribution, and international marketing are studied.

MKT 205 Advertising Principles 3 Credits

Basic theory, functions, principles, and applications of advertising are the focus of this course. The relation of advertising to our economy, the advertising department and the ad agency, selection of media, advertising practices, and the use of research to improve advertising techniques are covered.

Prerequisite: MKT 200. Required for advertising majors.

MKT 250 Retailing Management 3 Credits

The principles underlying successful retailing are analyzed within the framework of the strategic-planning process. Topics covered include location, merchandise planning, customer service, image, atmosphere, layout, pricing, promotion, personnel and operations management.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200.

MKT 260 Service Marketing 3 Credits

Focuses on the unique challenges of managing services and delivering quality service to customers. Emphasis is placed on the total organization, and how effective marketing and customer focus must be coordinated across multiple functions. The course is applicable to service organizations and to organizations that depend on service excellence for competitive advantage. Topics include customer-focused management, and customer satisfaction, retention, lifetime value and profitability. Students will learn to map services, understand customer expectations, and develop relationship marketing strategies.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200.

MKT 280 Sports Marketing 3 Credits

The course focuses on the unique challenges of marketing sports at a variety of levels: youth, college, professional, and international. The challenges of attracting and retaining fans and participants as well as of building and maintaining strong brand identity are at the heart of the course content. By evaluating case studies and examining current issues in sports marketing, students will gain an understanding of what it means to be a professional marketer of a sports organization and/or event.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200.

MKT 310 Business to Business Marketing 3 Credits

This course examines the business-to-business marketplace, and the planning and control tools used by its entities in managing the product, pricing, promotion, channel and supply chain management strategies.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200.

MKT 320 Consumer Behavior 3 Credits

The nature and determinants of consumer behavior are studied, with attention given to the influence of socio-psychological factors such as personality, small groups, demographic variables, social class, and culture on the formation of consumer attitudes, consumption patterns, and purchasing behavior.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200; Required for advertising majors.

MKT 330 International Marketing 3 Credits

This course examines the global marketplace and the complexities of its environmental influences, and necessary adaptations in formulating the strategies for product, pricing, promotion, channel and supply chain management.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200.

MKT 340 Personal Selling 3 Credits

Examines persuasive techniques utilized in sales presentations conducted on a person-to-person basis. Major course emphasis is on developing effective selling techniques; understanding the company, its products and the role of the salesperson in implementing product/market strategies; understanding the customers and the selling environment; application of effective sales presentation techniques; recognizing selling opportunities and careers.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200.

MKT 345 Customer Focus 3 Credits

Marketing supply chain management programs are concerned with the creation and delivery of value to customer and organizations. No longer simply the domain of the warehouse manager or logistics director, supply chain management is viewed by most companies as a mission-critical element. Marketing focuses on developing an understanding of customers and markets, creating products and services based on that understanding, and communicating and delivering the value added. This course will teach the student the essential role of marketing in all aspects of successful supply chain management - relationship management, technological and financial - and it will help the student understand the structure, functions, principles and methods employed in discovering and translating consumer needs and wants into product and service specifications and then transferring these goods and services from producers to consumers or end users.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200 and GSC 115 or permission of instructor.

MKT 350 Retailing Management 3 Credits

The principles underlying successful retailing are analyzed within the framework of the strategic-planning process. Topics covered include location, merchandise planning, customer service, image, atmosphere, layout, pricing, promotion, personnel and operations management.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200.

MKT 366 Marketing Research 3 Credits

Topics include specific research procedures in gathering, processing, analyzing, and presenting information relevant to marketing problems: advertising planning and effectiveness; product development; distribution channels; sales techniques; consumer behavior; and forecasting. Student learning about research planning, implementation, and interpretation is facilitated by the use of projects or cases.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200; MSD 200, MSD 201; junior standing; Required for marketing and advertising majors.

MKT 369 International Advertising 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the general landscape of international advertising with emphasis on understanding the opportunities and challenges entailed in international advertising management. The course will cover the subject from three aspects, including the international advertising environment, the international advertising industry, and international advertising strategies.

Prerequisite: MKT 200 or permission of instructor.

MKT 370 Internet Marketing 3 Credits

This course emphasizes the discipline of internet marketing, including practices of leading online marketing companies, state of the art online research and demonstrates how the Internet is creating value for customers and profits for businesses while also fitting into a firm’s complete marketing strategy. This course will provide a strategic and tactical toolkit for the online marketer, help students understand how and why the Internet is changing traditional marketing and allow students to develop the skills, strategies and tactics important to develop successful Internet marketing plans.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200 and CIS 185.

MKT 375 Digital Advertising and Social Media 3 Credits

This course surveys the concepts, principles, practices and industry standards of digital advertising, including standard display and rich media advertising, search advertising, email advertising, game advertising, and mobile advertising. It also introduces the strategies and tactics in social media marketing. The course emphasizes a strategic, holistic view of digital advertising and social media as marketing communication tools that are situated in the marketing strategic framework and employed to engage consumers in community building.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200.

MKT 380 Healthcare Marketing 3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the role, functions and tasks of healthcare marketing. Attention is devoted to applying basic marketing principles to the healthcare sector. Marketing decision making and analysis will be emphasized through the use of cases and current readings that focus on a variety of healthcare organizations, including hospitals, assisted living facilities, MCOs, and pharmaceutical companies.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200 or permission of instructor.

MKT 440 Sales Management 3 Credits

By means of lectures, discussions, and case studies, the field of marketing management is analyzed from the viewpoint of sales executives. The responsibilities for planning and administering personal selling operations are emphasized. Considerable attention is given to other activities for which sales executives may be wholly or jointly responsible, such as decision making on promotion and brand management.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200 and senior standing.

MKT 444 Spec. Topics Honors: Mkt & Law 3 Credits

MKT 460 Marketing Management Seminar 3 Credits

This capstone course for marketing majors employs a top management approach to the overall marketing task, including planning, organizing, controlling, and integrating all the activities of the marketing program. Integration of marketing with other operations of the business unit is emphasized. Major problems and current trends are identified and analyzed through case discussion.

Prerequisite(s): Marketing major and 15 semester hours of marketing; Required for marketing majors.

MKT 469 Selected Topics in Marketing 3 Credits

The study of a topic (or combination of topics) that represents some dimension of marketing or has important and direct implications for marketing management. Theoretical foundations as well as special applications of marketing decision making may be explored. Readings, research, lectures, discussions, or other appropriate methods are employed to stimulate student learning.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 200 and senior standing or permission of instructor.

MKT 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Topic to be approved by the professor and chairperson. Available for juniors and seniors. No more than 12 credits allowed toward graduation, which may be counted as a business or free elective.

MKT 491 Internship-Based Indep Study 3 Credits

Provides the student an opportunity to supplement and apply classroom work in supervised employment with participating marketing and advertising firms. Requirements include a journal with a log of daily activities, and a project or term paper presented to and evaluated by the internship sponsor. Evaluation will also include a report by the company on the intern’s performance. Credits may be used to satisfy business or free elective requirements.

Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.