Organizational Psychology B.S.B.A.

Overview

Are you interested in knowing what motivates a person to perform well at a job, or what qualities a company needs to look for to make a great hire? Today’s businesses and organizations need professionals who understand human behavior, group dynamics and how to make the workplace function better. A major in Organizational Psychology from Rider University will help prepare you for a career in one of America’s fastest-growing professions.

Curriculum Overview

Rider University’s program is one of just a handful in the nation offering a unique interdisciplinary major that combines business and psychology. This versatile degree can have a real impact on an organization’s bottom line by helping to improve employee satisfaction and job performance.

Majors in this program will gain a comprehensive understanding of the important contributions that organizational psychology plays in today’s workplace.

The Organizational Psychology program focuses on the behavioral aspects of managing and supervising the human resources of an organization or business. You will learn the key concepts of management and psychology, including perception and attitudes, employee motivation and engagement, and organizational leadership and power — and gain an in-depth understanding of what makes employees and organizations function at their best.

As an Organizational Psychology major, you will:

  •         Develop a comprehensive understanding of human behavior in work settings
  •         Learn how to enhance performance within an organization or business
  •         Benefit from networking and gain real-world experience through internships and other professional opportunities 

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics ranks Industrial-Organizational Psychology at the top of its list of 20-fastest growing occupations, with a projected growth rate of 53 percent between now and 2022. Organizational psychologists are in demand because their expertise results in better hires, increased productivity, reduced turnover and lower labor costs. They can work as consultants to organizations, or serve in-house in a variety of jobs, including:

  •         Human resource officer
  •         Employee development manager
  •         Organizational development director
  •         Quality performance manager
  •         Organizational psychologist
  •         Testing specialist
  •         Compensation and benefits specialist

Degree Offered

  •         BSBA in Organizational Psychology

Contact

Eugene Kutcher, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chairperson
Sweigart Hall 237
609-896-5203
ekutcher@rider.edu

Program Website:  Organizational Psychology
Associated Department:  Department of Management

Related Programs

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

College of Business Administration Core Requirements

Required Courses
MGT 310Intro to Human Resource Mgmt3
MGT 355Team Management3
PSY 100Introduction to Psychology3
PSY 105Introduction to Research in Psychology3
PSY 240Social Psychology3
PSY 329Research Methods in Organizational Psychology4
Choose two of the following courses:6
Employee Selection & Training
Employee Compensation Systems
Employee Engagement
Managing Workforce Diversity
Independent Research and Study 1
Choose two of the following courses:6
Personality
Learning and Memory
Psychological Tests
Senior Seminar
Independent Research and Study 1
Total Credits31
1

Students may take either PSY 490 or MGT 490 to satisfy major requirements, but may not count both courses towards the major requirements. 

Academic Plan of Study

The following educational plan is provided as a sample only.  Rider students who do not declare a major during their freshman year; who change their major; or those who transfer to Rider may follow a different plan to ensure a timely graduation.  Each student, with guidance from his or her academic advisor, will develop a personalized educational plan.

Plan of Study Grid
Year 1
Fall SemesterSemester Credit Hours
CIS 185 Information Systems Essentials 1 3
CMP 120 Expository Writing 2 3
MSD 105 Quantitative Methods for Business 3 3
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology (Natural Science Elective) 3
Natural Science Elective 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Spring Semester
CBA 102 Career Plan & Perspective I 4 1
CMP 125 Research Writing 3
ECO 200 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
MKT 200 Marketing Principles 3
MSD 200 Statistical Methods I 3
PSY 105 Introduction to Research in Psychology 3
 Semester Credit Hours16
Year 2
Fall Semester
ACC 210 Introduction to Accounting 3
CBA 202 Career Plan & Perspect II 4 1
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics 3
MGT 201 Fund Management & Org Behavior 3
MSD 201 Statistical Methods II 3
PSY 240 Social Psychology 3
 Semester Credit Hours16
Spring Semester
ACC 220 Managerial Uses of Accounting 3
COM 290 Professional/Strategic Speech 3
FIN 220 Introduction to Finance 3
MGT 310 Intro to Human Resource Mgmt 3
Global/Cultural Liberal Arts Elective 6 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Year 3
Fall Semester
BUS 300 Social & Legal Environment Bus 3
CBA 302 Career Plan & Perspect III 4 1
MGT 355 Team Management 3
Org Psych Major Elective (PSY) 3
Humanities Elective 3
Free Elective 5 3
 Semester Credit Hours16
Spring Semester
CIS 385 Management Information Systems 3
MSD 340 Production and Operations 3
Org Psych Major Elective (MGT/HRM) 3
Global/Cultural Liberal Arts Elective 6 3
 Semester Credit Hours12
Year 4
Fall Semester
BUS 400 Strategic Mgmt and Policy 3
Org Psych Major Elective (PSY) 3
Free Elective 5 3
Free Elective 5 3
Free Elective 5 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
Spring Semester
Org Psych Major Elective (MGT/HRM) 3
PSY 329 Research Methods in Organizational Psych 4
Free Elective 5 3
Free Elective 5 3
Free Elective 5 3
 Semester Credit Hours16
 Total Credit Hours for Graduation121
1

CIS 185 Information Systems Essential can be taken in the Fall or Spring of Year 1.

2

 Students may be required to take CMP 115 Intro to Expository Writing based on placement. CMP 115 counts as a 3-credit Free Elective.

3

Students may be required to take MSD 104 Intro to Quantitative Methods based on placement. MSD 104 counts as a 3-credit Free Elective. 

4

Transfer Students can take MGT 336 Career Management (3 credits) as a substitute for the Career Planning sequence. 

5

Students are required to complete 6 credits of International Business Electives which can be fulfilled as major courses or as free electives. 

6

Global/Cultural Liberal Arts Electives can be satisfied by courses that are designated as global/cultural, including language courses at the 101-level or above.

Academic Plan of Study

The following educational plan is provided as a sample only.  Rider students who do not declare a major during their freshman year; who change their major; or those who transfer to Rider may follow a different plan to ensure a timely graduation.  Each student, with guidance from his or her academic advisor, will develop a personalized educational plan.

Plan of Study Grid
Year 1
Fall SemesterSemester Credit Hours
CIS 185 Information Systems Essentials 3
CMP 120 Expository Writing 3
ECO 200 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
MSD 105 Quantitative Methods for Business 3
Science Elective 3
 Semester Credit Hours15
JTerm
MKT 200 Marketing Principles 3
 Semester Credit Hours3
Spring Semester
CBA 102 Career Plan & Perspective I 1
CMP 125 Research Writing 3
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics 3
MSD 200 Statistical Methods I 3
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
Humanities Elective 3
 Semester Credit Hours16
Summer Semester
ACC 210 Introduction to Accounting 3
Free Elective 1 3
 Semester Credit Hours6
Year 2
Fall Semester
CBA 202 Career Plan & Perspect II 1
COM 290 Professional/Strategic Speech 3
FIN 220 Introduction to Finance 3
MGT 201 Fund Management & Org Behavior 3
MSD 201 Statistical Methods II 3
PSY 105 Introduction to Research in Psychology 3
Global/Cultural Elective 3
 Semester Credit Hours19
JTerm
Free Elective 2 3
 Semester Credit Hours3
Spring Semester
ACC 220 Managerial Uses of Accounting 3
CBA 302 Career Plan & Perspect III 1
MGT 310 Intro to Human Resource Mgmt 3
PSY 240 Social Psychology 3
MGT 355 Team Management 3
Global/Cultural Elective 3
 Semester Credit Hours16
Summer Semester
Free Elective 3 3
Free Elective 4 3
 Semester Credit Hours6
Year 3
Fall Semester
BUS 300 Social & Legal Environment Bus 3
CIS 385 Management Information Systems 3
MSD 340 Production and Operations 3
Int'l Business Elective 1 3
Major Course Elective (PSY) 3
Major Course Elective (MGT/HR) 3
 Semester Credit Hours18
JTerm
Free Elective 5 3
 Semester Credit Hours3
Spring Semester
BUS 400 Strategic Mgmt and Policy 3
Int'l Business Elective 2 3
Major Course Elective (PSY) 3
Major Course Elective (MGT/HR) 3
PSY 329 Research Methods in Organizational Psychology 4
 Semester Credit Hours16
 Total Credit Hours for Graduation121
  • Assumes no AP or other credits transferred into Rider University.
  • Students are required to take 6 credits of International Business Electives.
  • Business Honors students may have a different sequence.
  • Global/Cultural Liberal Arts Electives can be satisfied by courses that are designated as global/cultural, including language courses at the 101-level or above.

ACC 210 Introduction to Accounting 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to basic principles and methods of accounting essential to preparation, understanding and interpretation of financial statements. Topics include accounting for merchandising concerns, current assets, long-term assets, liabilities and equity accounts. A brief overview of internal control is also covered.

ACC 220 Managerial Uses of Accounting 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the use of accounting information in managerial decision-making. Topics include cost behavior, cost classifications, and problem-solving functions of accounting as they pertain to planning, control, evaluation of performance, special decisions, and budgeting. The interpretation of published financial statements and the statement of cash flow are also covered.

Prerequisite(s): ACC 210.

BUS 300 Social & Legal Environment Bus 3 Credits

The strategies by which organizations in the private as well as the public sectors interact with, adapt to, and attempt to influence their external environments are explored. The primary emphasis is on evaluating the effect of business and governmental decisions on the quality of life. The role of regulatory agencies and the impact of local and national legislation on organizational behavior are considered.

Prerequisite(s): 54 credits.

BUS 400 Strategic Mgmt and Policy 3 Credits

This capstone course for seniors in business administration provides a framework for problem identification, analysis, and decision making within the organization. Students are given the opportunity to integrate and apply previously acquired knowledge of accounting, decision sciences, economics, finance, marketing, management, and statistics. Case studies, critical incidents, and other appropriate techniques are utilized.

Prerequisite(s): 84 credits, CIS 185, ACC 210, ACC 220, MKT 200, MGT 201, FIN 300, MSD 340, BUS 300, CIS 485.

CBA 102 Career Plan & Perspective I 1 Credits

In this course students will explore their own history, goals and values as input to their definition of success. The course will set the stage for the remainder of students' college career, and will encourage them to draw connections among their career goals, educational performance, extra-curricular experiences, and available resources.

CBA 202 Career Plan & Perspect II 1 Credits

In this course, students will build on their CBA 102 self assessments to identify specific occupations that match who they are and where they want to go. The course will provide students with the understanding of the changed nature of the current work and career environment they will be entering when they graduate from Rider. They will acquire career management skills and apply these skills to develop short and long term career goals and plans for achieving them while at Rider. The course will also touch on the intersection of work and family roles.

Prerequisite(s): CBA 102.

CBA 302 Career Plan & Perspect III 1 Credits

This one credit course will be targeted to second semester sophomores and juniors. In this course, students will build on their CBA 102 and 202 self assessments to develop strategies for a successful job search. The course will provide studens with an understanding of the changed nature of the current work and career environment they will be entering when they graduate from Rider. They will acquire career management and job search skills and apply these skills to developing, networks, identify job search resources and enhance resume and interview skills. Students will understand how to research potential employers and tranaslate their experiences into a successful job search strategy.

Prerequisite(s): CBA 102 and CBA 202.

CIS 185 Information Systems Essentials 3 Credits

This course will enable students to use Microsoft Excel and Access to design and create complex applications to support effective decision making. Students will use Excel to design and create spreadsheets to support business analytics. Access will be used to understand, design, create, and utilize relational databases.

CIS 385 Management Information Systems 3 Credits

The course focuses on the management and use of information systems and technology for the strategic and operational advantage of the firm. Students explore the business value of information resources including current communication, database, as well as hardware and software technologies. GSC 385 can fulfill the CIS 385 requirement for all business majors. Please note: Students will not receive credit for both GSC 385 and CIS 385 without prior approval by the Dean's office.

Prerequisite(s): CIS 185 and junior or senior standing.

CMP 120 Expository Writing 3 Credits

Students will increase their competence in the critical reading of challenging college-level texts that engage significant ideas and in writing effective essays that advance a clear and meaningful thesis while demonstrating understanding of those texts. The second of the department’s three-course composition sequence,

Prerequisite(s): Successfully completed CMP 115 or have attained a 530 or above on the writing section and 500 or above on the critical reading section of the SAT or a score of 4 or above on the English department placement test.

CMP 125 Research Writing 3 Credits

Introduces students to the process of library research and documented writing. Emphasis will be on the refinement of critical reading, thinking, and writing strategies applied to multiple sources and documented papers.

Prerequisite(s): CMP 120 or BHP 100.

COM 290 Professional/Strategic Speech 3 Credits

Provides students with practical information necessary for effective communication in various business and professional settings. Covers communication processes, principles, and models in the modern organization. Class assignments are given with emphasis on developing a knowledge and practical understanding of informative, persuasive, and impromptu presentations. Limited to students enrolled in the College of Business Administration.

ECO 200 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Credits

A collective view of income receiving and spending sectors of the national economy, including households, businesses, and governments. Issues discussed: What determines the level of output, income, and employment achieved by the economy? What determines the growth of national output and employment? National income accounting, income and employment theory, monetary system, general price level, business cycle, government policies designed to provide for full employment, price stability, and economic growth are also covered.

Prerequisite(s): Place into MSD 105 based on SAT or ACT Score, OR place into MSD 105/MTH 102 by passing College Placement, OR passing MTH 100S with a grade of ‘Y’, OR passing MSD 104, OR having transferred in any college level MSD or MTH class.

ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics 3 Credits

Market price systems are analyzed. The nature and characteristics of consumer and producer behavior, the theory of pricing in competitive and noncompetitive markets, and determination of the distribution of output a re evaluated. Welfare, social control, monopoly, and income inequality a re explored in the light of price theory. The role of the United States in the world economy is explored.

Prerequisite(s): Place into MSD 105 based on SAT or ACT Score, OR place into MSD 105/MTH 102 by passing College Placement, OR passing MTH 100S with a grade of ‘Y’, OR passing MSD 104, OR having transferred in any college level MSD or MTH class.

FIN 220 Introduction to Finance 3 Credits

An introduction to the environment, concepts, and techniques of financial management. Topics include forms of business organization, taxes, analysis of financial performance, financial planning, financial markets and interest rates, time value of money, bond and stock valuation, risk and return, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and international financial management.

Prerequisite(s): ACC 210 and ECO 201.

HRM 315 Employee Selection & Training 3 Credits

This course explains the processes involved in selecting and training employees. With regards to selection, specific examples include, evaluating applicant credentials, administering pre-employment tests and complying with equal employment opportunity legislation. With regards to training, topics include assessing the need for training, designing effective training programs, utilizing methods such as technology to deliver training, and evaluating the effectiveness of training programs.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310.

HRM 316 Employee Compensation Systems 3 Credits

The goal of this course is to familiarize you with the common methods of compensation used by today’s organizations and how these methods could be used to increase motivation, job satisfaction, and performance in the workplace. To accomplish this, we will first discuss the bases of motivation in the workplace. Next, we will then talk about the various compensation options and techniques and the strengths and weaknesses of each in maximizing motivation and performance in an organization.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310.

HRM 333 Employee Engagement 3 Credits

Employee Engagement is commonly described as a focused passion and enthusiasm that employees bring to their work that produces high-quality performance and positive organizational outcomes such as enhanced firm reputation, customer loyalty, and profitability. In this course, students will explore the concept and value of Employee Engagement, and strategies for energizing an organization's workforce. Projects and activities will focus on the role of the Human Resource function in measuring employee attitudes, designing relevant interventions, and influencing a culture of engagement.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 310.

MGT 201 Fund Management & Org Behavior 3 Credits

This course deals with the fundamentals of organizational behavior as they relate to management such as motivation, communications, and leadership. Behavior is examined at the individual, group, and organizational level. The management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling are addressed. The effects of global operations and the requirements of ethical behavior on managers are also explored.

Prerequisite(s): minimum 30 credits completed.

MGT 310 Intro to Human Resource Mgmt 3 Credits

This course deals with the nature of human resource management, its functions, procedures, and practices currently found in profit, non-profit and public sector organizations. Topics covered include recruiting and selection, t raining, human resource development, equal employment opportunity, performance appraisal, diversity, job analysis, compensation, and employee rights and discipline.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 320 Managing Workforce Diversity 3 Credits

Demographic shifts, changing patterns of labor force participation, global competition, and a growing cultural emphasis on the celebration of difference have all contributed to the creation of diversity as a hot topic in management. This course explores the opportunities and challenges of the increasingly diverse workforce emerging in the United States today. We will address the knowledge and skills managers must develop in working with others who are different from themselves. Some of these differences are obvious- gender, race, age, and physical characteristics. Other differences are not as easily observed - family structure, educational level, social class, and sexual orientation. This class incorporates experiential learning techniques for personal growth.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 355 Team Management 3 Credits

This course prepares students to work in organizations that use teams as an integral part of their functioning-an increasingly common practice. The class involves intensive group interaction, focusing on individual growth in group settings. Working with other students in role-plays, exercises, and team assignments allows the student to develop better communication and leadership skills.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MGT 490 Independent Research and Study 1-4 Credits

Topic to be approved in advance by supervising instructor, chairperson, and academic dean. Available for juniors and seniors. No more than 12 credits allowed toward graduation, and can be used as free elective or MGT major elective.

Prerequisite(s): MGT 201 or permission of instructor.

MKT 200 Marketing Principles 3 Credits

This course examines market characteristics, consumer buying habits and motives, and functions of marketing within the framework of the strategic marketing planning process. Concepts and current practices in product development, pricing, promotion, distribution, and international marketing are studied.

MSD 105 Quantitative Methods for Business 3 Credits

The aim of this introductory course is to acquaint students with a number of basic mathematical techniques that will enhance their ability to become effective decision-makers in a realistic business environment. Topics covered include linear equations and inequalities, linear programming, summation notation, geometric series, counting techniques, event probability and discrete random variables. Where appropriate, these tools will be illustrated with examples chosen from business settings.

Prerequisite(s): MSD 104 or a passing grade on the Math Placement Exam.

MSD 200 Statistical Methods I 3 Credits

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of continuous random variables, the elements of statistical inference, and an introduction to how these tools may be useful in one’s attempt to reach intelligent conclusions in real-world settings. The focus is on the normal random variable, descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, and the frameworks of estimation and hypothesis testing, particularly as they apply to inference for unknown population means and proportions in the one- and two-sample settings.

Prerequisite(s): MSD 105 or equivalent.

MSD 201 Statistical Methods II 3 Credits

The sequel to Statistical Methods I is designed to prepare the student to be able to recognize a variety of additional common inferential scenarios, select and apply appropriate techniques in their analyses, and be aware of the usefulness of computer packages in performing certain relatively complicated statistical calculations. the course covers the one-way analysis of variance, Chi-square tests for non parametric inferences, and regression analysis. Students are expected to submit, for evaluation, the analysis of a real-world data set.

Prerequisite(s): MSD 200.

MSD 340 Production and Operations 3 Credits

This course introduces the concepts and techniques of designing and managing manufacturing and service systems and their operations effectively and efficiently. Major topics include product and process design, facility location, forecasting, aggregate planning, inventory management, supply chain management, project management, just-in-time systems, quality assurance, linear programming, and the transportation problem. Current issues such as productivity, global competitiveness, and quality are also discussed.

Prerequisite(s): MSD 105 or MSD 110, MSD 200 or MTH 340, MSD 201 or MTH 341.

PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 Credits

An orientation to psychology, covering major facts, principles and concepts about human and animal behavior and experience, re-search findings, major problems, basic vocabulary, methodologies, and contributions in the field. Topics include psychology as a science; human development; individual differences; intelligence and its measurement; special aptitudes and interests; personality and social behavior; motivation and emotion; frustration and personality deviations; and learning, thinking, remembering and forgetting.

PSY 105 Introduction to Research in Psychology 3 Credits

Students will be introduced to the basic research methods used in psychology including, surveys, experiments and observation. Students will collect data and learn to describe this data using basic tools of analysis including graphic display and statistical analysis. Students will read original psychological research and learn to write using the conventions of the American Psychological Association.

Prerequisite(s): a grade of "C" in PSY 100.

PSY 215 Personality 3 Credits

A synthesis of the most recent research in the field of personality development. Topics include interplay of biological, cultural, and subjective personal processes; analysis of the broad trends in personality theories; and introduction to personality measurement.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 100.

PSY 225 Learning and Memory 3 Credits

A broad coverage of the expanding fields of learning, memory, and cognition is provided, while addressing their relevance and impact on human behavior. Continuity between early associationistic and contemporary cognitive theories is established. Topics range from basic conditioning to the more complex processes of memory, concept learning, thinking, and problem solving. Prerequiste(s): PSY 100.

PSY 240 Social Psychology 3 Credits

Deals with the scientific study of human beings in social situations, focusing on reciprocal influence of the individual and the group, especially aspects of behavior that are socially determined. The nature of attitudes: their development and change; the nature of social influence; interpersonal perception and attraction; dynamics of social behavior; and social phenomena, such as prejudice and social movements, are covered.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 100.

PSY 315 Psychological Tests 3 Credits

Examines the history of psychological testing. Issues concerning the construction of psychological tests are discussed, including concepts concerning reliability, validity, and item analysis. The rationale and structure of the major tests of intelligence, aptitude, and personality are reviewed, including the Rorschach, WAIS, TAT, MMPI, and Bender- Gestalt. In the last section of the course, students are given hands-on experience in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a standard test battery.

Prerequisite(s): any statistics course.

PSY 329 Research Methods in Organizational Psychology 4 Credits

This course covers general area of research methods such as experimental and non-experimental methods, measurement, statistics, and preparation of reports for presentation and publication. In addition, research topics common in the area of organizational psychology such as worker motivation, job satisfaction, stress and burnout, communications in the workplace, productivity, decision-making, leadership style, and organizational structure will also be discussed. Students gain hands-on experience conducting empirical research.

PSY 400 Senior Seminar 3 Credits

This capstone course will provide a synthesis and evaluation of important critical issues in psychology, such as the role of modern psychology in solving social problems, the scientific vs. human services perspectives on behavior, emotion and cognition; and the nature of mental illness and well-being. Students will be expected to draw broadly from their education in psychology; to grapple with conflicting points of view; and produce professional quality writing, oral or multimedia presentations.